Electronic House Music: A Concept

In this week’s blog, I am going to focus on my favorite sub-genre of Electronic Dance Music: House Music.

Most of you know of house music from parties, clubs, or festivals. It has a catchy beat that you can’t help bobbing your head or moving your arms to. Others know how to shuffle to this music (I am still learning but I am impressed with everyone who can break out in shuffle).

House music originated in Chicago at a club called The Warehouse in 1977. Frankie Knuckles, who opened The Warehouse, mixed old disco classics and new Eurobeat pop together. Many of these music experiments took place there, and House became the first descendant of disco.

House music is funny to me because there’s usually a couple of words in the song followed by a beat to dance to. It is repetitive, but that’s what makes it fun. It is usually in a range of 115-130 bpm (beats per minute). I know whenever I hear house music in public places, I can’t help but dance to it.

My featured image for this post shows my favorite house DJ, Tchami, during his back to back set with ZHU. This happened this summer at Hard Summer Music Festival. I was in the crowd for this set and it was a huge moment. ZHU and Tchami had never shared the stage before so everyone got to hear their iconic sounds combined.

Tchami usually shares the stage with Malaa, who I saw at EDC Las Vegas last year. I first saw Tchami in 2017 at the Brooklyn Bowl in Las Vegas — I fell in love with house music and I hope to see him five thousand more times.

In this post, I’m going to highlight some of the different types of house music. I will name some artists associated with the each type and some song suggestions to listen to.

Some different types that I am familiar with are Deep House, Bass House, Big Room House, Tech House and Future House.

For some popular house music titles, most of you probably know of these artists and their songs:

Deep House

This type of house music tends to have a lower bpm (around 120 bpm) and has greater influences from soul, jazz, and funk. I intertwine Deep House with Progressive House because they are both very similar. They are closely related to Trance music, as it has long accelerating peaks and troughs that progress throughout the track.

Bass House

Bass house has more baseline while also containing house music elements. It goes much “harder” because of the bass, and is usually around 145-150 bpm.

Big Room House

This is the more mainstream House music. It has lengthy build-ups and releases.

Tech House

This form of house music combines techno styles with house. It has more techno sounding beats with the rhythm of house music. I don’t listen to much tech house but here are some examples I came up with.

Future House

Future house emerged in the United Kingdom around 2010. It fuses deep house, garage house and other elements of electronic music into it. Garage house is known to have pitch-shifted and time-shifted vocals.

These are just a small amount of the many types of House music. This shows how vast the electronic music genre is. I’m still constantly learning about each one and I love to hear the differences. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do!

Written by: Alexandra Gex

CRSSD Fall ’17: The Highlights

The past three times I have attended CRSSD, I have never been disappointed, and this year was no exception. With sunshine, sparkles and delicious cocktails surrounding me, I found myself in pure bliss once again at Waterfront Park for the bi-annual house festival. Despite the absence of Damian Lazarus & the Ancient Moons,  this small San Diego festival has once again satisfied my House x Techno sweet tooth.

Unfortunately, it was impossible to see everyone on the CRSSD ’17 lineup, but hopefully I am able to shed some light on what went down this past weekend.

Weekend Favorites:

Chris Lake:
After hearing Chris Lake’s 2016 single, “Operator (Ring Ring),” at practically every stage during CRSSD Spring ’17, it was expected that this English artist would dominate with his own set at CRSSD, and boy did he! Chris Lake did not hesitate to bring all he had, as he hyped the crowd with recent hits such as “I Want You” and “Nothing Better.”

 

Hotel Garuda:
As someone who has already seen Hotel Garuda twice, I was shocked to find that their CRSSD set strayed from the usual, and let me tell you, IT SLAYED! In previous set’s, Hotel Garuda is know to get groovy and yes, even a little dirty in their beats. But, over the weekend, they pleased festival goers with a nice balance of funk, house and the “Feels.”

 

RUFUS DU SOL:
Speaking of the THE FEELS, this Australian trio is unlike any other, making you feel things you didn’t think you could in musical performance. The live version of their hit song “Innerbloom” is the epitome of them as a group. RUFUS DU SOL is one of my favorite artists of all time and I was thrilled to finally see a full RUFUS set. Their set embodied everything CRSSD! The unity, the love, the vibes!

 

The Black Madonna:
ALL HAIL THE QUEEN! Meet the woman who defies what it means to be a female DJ. Although many may have been unfamiliar with her name, The Black Madonna truly put her stamp on the festival with a remarkable set that was somewhere between disco and techno. With her DGAF attitude, The Black Madonna poured her energy into the crowd.

 


Song of the weekend:

17 By: MK

Played both at Hotel Garuda and The Magician’s sets, the presence of MK was heard as his new single 17 was played multiple times throughout the weekend. As a performer last year, and inspiration this year, MK proves time and time again why he continues being a huge part of house music 28 years later.


CRSSD 2018?

Carl Cox: If you want an OG house DJ, look no further than the father himself. Carl Cox began his career back in the early 80’s and has continued proving to the world why he is a house God. To have him at CRSSD would be legendary, and I for one, would LOVE to see that happen.

Hayden James: Following the line of amazing Australian artists, Hayden James is not very known here in the U.S. – but don’t be fooled. Signed under Future Classic with other artists such as Flume and Chet Faker, (who both previously performed at CRSSD) James shows true promise as a stand-alone artist with truly unique sounds.

Disclosure: Many know Disclosure for hit songs such as “Latch” and “You & Me,” but that is not all they should be known for: Disclosure is known to put on some amazing DJ sets. Disclosure is more than a few pop songs, and is a house duo that would put on a great CRSSD show if given the chance.

 

 

The Red Baron – KCR Secret Sessions

SDSU’s very own The Red Baron stopped by the studio for a Secret Sessions interview. We talked to the the producer about Kanye West, carrot fingers, and Tchaikovsky. 

After his track Sway was featured on HillyDilly and Diplo & Friends, the EDM artist has garnered some well deserved attention. We wanted to bring you an exclusive before he gets too big for San Diego vibes and moves to LA (any day now).

After the interview he laid down a guest mix featuring Disclosure, Birdy Nam Nam, and original tracks. If you get addicted, don’t fret. You can download it free on Soundcloud, along with basically everything else The Red Baron has laid his hands on. 

The Red Baron KCR Guest Mix

Recently signed to All Mine, The Red Baron calls his sound “dance music for the opera house.” His musical career started out 10 years ago, learning to play the guitar and cello, and then struggling to make electro house.

Now that he’s found his sound, he says it’s constantly evolving. For now: Electronic. Trap. Crazy melodies. Intricate arpeggios. Tackling classical legends.

Settle in for The Red Baron’s extended interview and get acquainted.

Listen to The Red Baron’s latest single, listen to all the tracks we talked about, and download his EP Deliverance on Soundcloud

Connect with The Red Baron
Soundcloud | Facebook
 
Twitter | Instagram
 allminela.com

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Videographer & Editor: Valeria Miranda
Interviewer: Jewell Karinen

Local or visiting band interested in recording a KCR Secret Session? Let us know!
Contact us at:kcr.music (at) mail.sdsu.edu or
kcr.entertainment (at) mail.sdsu.edu