Album Review: Elijah Rosario’s “Genuine Truths”

Elijah Rosario is a singer-songwriter from Durham, North Carolina who, in his 10-year long career has taken influences from many different artists and genres, and being the great storyteller that he is, he paints a great picture of where he’s been and where he intends to go through his music. Two EP’s in, you can really hear the growth in his voice, his sound, his identity, and he really knows how to put on a show.

On his album “Genuine Truths,” which releases on all music platforms on Sept. 29, we hear a mix of R&B, pop, Afro-pop, and hip-hop, being graced with features from hip-hop and R&B artist Voyce, Afro-pop artist Livie, and hip-hop artist Kfreshh. His interchangeability from genre to genre, mixed with a knack for writing some incredibly catchy hooks makes this an album I 100% recommend to anyone reading.

This 10-track album is a quick listen, with each song running around two and a half to three and a half minutes long, but each song is jam-packed with beautiful melodies met with great storytelling.

Rosario’s voice is one of his greatest assets, luring you in with his melodies, and leaving you wanting more and more when each track finishes. His hooks remind me of Don Tolliver, PartyNextDoor, and even DVSN when we begin to hear the more sensual tracks. His music can be easily implemented into any R&B playlist you have, and I have a feeling listener’s ears will perk up every time his music comes on from now on.

The songs that I loved the most on the album so far are “Need Me,” “Movie Star” which features Voyce, and “Best of Me” featuring Livie.

“Need Me” was the first song on the album that really grabbed me, featuring the great writing ability that Rosario portrays so well throughout his music. And again, his hooks boost the replayability of his songs tenfold; creating earworms that will have you singing his songs for days.

“Movie Star” featuring Voyce is a quick 2:33 track that highlights some great production, another great hook, and promotes a great time of hanging out with your friends and living large and unapologetic. This album is full of good vibes and songs to play either while driving around, as party anthems, or even a great addition to some of your more R-rated playlists.

Lastly, “Best of Me” featuring Livie features the most prevalent Afro-pop influences and is arguably one of the best tracks on the album. The sensuality of the lyrics mixed with the groovy production and the beautiful vocals from Livie makes for an incredible track. The two artists flow so well together and I’ve mentioned this multiple times already, but Rosario’s hook comes through as the outright highlight of the song, and one of the best on the entire album.

I highly recommend listening to “Genuine Truths” when it releases on Wednesday, Sept. 29, and listening to all of Elijah Rosario’s music whenever you get the chance. His biggest singles to date are “Need Me” and “Survive” and I can tell that several songs on the album will find their way onto many listener’s favorite playlists.

Written by: Sam Esser

Album Review: Joyce Wrice-Overgrown

The R&B singer delivers her brand of throwback vibes on her debut album

Joyce Wrice has been bubbling for some time on the underground R&B scene. The LA-based singer/songwriter broke out in 2016 with her EP Stay Around and continued with collaborations with artists such as Westside Gunn of Griselda, The Free Nationals, and Crush. Under the partnership with R&B producer and frequent Ty Dolla $ign collaborator  D’Mile, Wrice takes listeners onto a time capsule back to the heyday of 1990s hip hop soul with Overgrown.
From the jump, it’s apparent that this project takes various cues from musical elements of R&B albums of that era. The most striking takeaway of this album’s sound is the lush but gritty instrumentation across all tracks. Funky guitar licks, boom-bap drums, string melodies and winding chord progressions permeate tracks such as Chandler, Losing, and Addicted. The self-titled track is a piano laden ballad that shares similar themes of self-love and strength with Mary J. Blige’s material, particularly My Life. The collaboration with fellow half-Japanese R&B singer UMI, a remix to That’s On You, carries a bluesy feel and is noteworthy for having a crossover appeal with Japanese lyrics. So So Sick is perhaps the biggest musical tribute to 90s R&B, with a subtle sample of Jon B’s 1997 hit They Don’t Know.

Another element Overgrown borrows from 1990s R&B albums is the balance of soulfulness and hip hop swagger through its collaborations and structure. On One with Freddie Gibbs carries the spirit of singer-rapper collabs such as Anything by SWV and Wu Tang Clan and Can’t You See by Total and the Notorious BIG. Westside Gunn’s Interlude, featuring the eponymous rapper, is humorously vulgar and reminiscent of rap interludes and intros on R&B albums by the likes of Phife Dawg and Busta Rhymes. Falling In Love, with fellow D’Mile collaborator Lucky Daye, hearkens back to collabs between singers like Slow Jam by Usher and Monica, and Final Warning by Ginuwine and Aaliyah. The album’s mix of uptempos and slow jams are tied together cohesively by interludes in the same way Faith Evans and Blackstreet used them on their albums.

Overall, Overgrown is a strong debut album for Joyce Wrice with its rich melodic textures compared to a majority of modern R&B albums with heavy hip hop influence. If this project is a sign of Wrice’s future as an artist, is it clear that she’ll be a breath of fresh air for R&B.

Score: 9.5/10

Written by Kristian Gonzales

Album Review: Duke Deuce- Duke Nukem

The Memphis rapper delivers some fight club energy with this project.

Duke Deuce has been one of the frontrunners of Memphis’s emerging rap scene along with other artists like Blocboy JB and Young Dolph. As heard through songs like Crunk Ain’t Dead Remix and Crunk Ain’t Dead MOB, Deuce aims to evoke the rowdy vibe of 90s and 2000s Southern rap greats like Three 6 Mafia. Duke Nukem is no exception with Deuce delivering bangers on top of bangers that makes you want to throw someone through a wall.

The opening track Intro: Coming Out Hard is a strong reminder of Duke’s Memphis roots, with the title and funky sound reminiscent of the duo 8Ball & MJG and their 1992 album Comin’ Out Hard. Soldiers Steppin is arguably the album’s biggest highlight with its echoing drums and military-esque call and response rapping. Fell Up In The Club with A$AP Ferg continues the homage to Memphis with a sample of Paper Chaser by EP & Dow Jones. Gangsta Party brings energy into trap’s oversaturated trend of minimalistic piano-laden beats with a feature by Offset and Deuce’s almost sing-song delivery. Back 2 Back brings a vicious vibe with an icy beat and an even more aggressive presence by Deuce. One of the biggest strengths of the album is Duke’s presence as a rapper. Overall, the lyrics on this project are your typical gun-toting, sexual bravado, and gangbanging fare, but he elevates it through his energized delivery and ad-libs.

If there’s any weaknesses to this album, it’s simply because Duke doesn’t seek to provide anything groundbreaking to hip hop. However, this doesn’t necessarily indicate an overall weakness in his artistry. Army and Outro:Go 2 Hell are Duke’s foray into harmonized raps, but feels like tedious and odd fits compared to the album’s headbanging atmosphere. The simplistic  hook on Toot Toot with Young Dolph drags the song down despite some solid verses. Kirk with Mulatto is a solid track, but could feel repetitive with its piano-heavy production if compared with Gangsta Party.

Overall, Duke Nukem is an enjoyable project that serves a healthy heap of hardcore club bangers. If you need any music to rage out to, then this album is made for you.

Score: 7.5/10

Written by Kristian Gonzales

Picture Source: Medium



Album Review: Nick Drake – Pink Moon

Nick Drake’s album Pink Moon shines as a highly influential folk album

Released in 1972, Nick Drake’s third and final album saw Drake take a more personal approach to composing a folk album, choosing to only feature his singing along with his fingerpicked acoustic guitar. This stands true for all but the first song on the album, “Pink Moon”, which features a simple piano melody throughout. Nick Drake’s previous two albums, Five Leaves Left and Bryter Layter, had more traditional folk rock instrumentation, featuring drums guitars and other staples of the genre. But while these albums did feature Drake’s acoustic guitar, it played more of a background role. However, in Pink Moon it takes center stage. This gives the album a much more personal feel to it, compared to his earlier work.

Drake’s soft singing and beautiful fingerpicked guitar stand strongly on their own, and the individual songs themselves include some artful lyricism. In “Place to Be” he sings of viewing his past unbridled self through the viewpoint of his current self, and in “Which Will” he sings about the choices people make when faced with the many unknowns of life. Sadly, Nick Drake never got to witness his final albums success. After he released this album he withdrew from recording any new material or playing live, and later passed in 1974 after overdosing on a prescribed anti-depressant.

The space in musical history that this album occupies is a special one. In the 1970’s there was an explosion of styles and genres in western music. And for this album to be remembered as a classic, and a highly influential too, along with much more flashy or pop appealing albums speaks to its excellence.

Cover Photo: Keith Morris/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images Nick Drake

Written By: Ethan Zaro