The Sounds of State

Have you ever wondered what everyone walking around campus is listening to through their headphones? I most definitely have. Personally, I cannot imagine walking around campus, doing homework, driving around, or getting ready without music and was curious to see if this was the same for my fellow SDSU students.

I created a survey to learn about what types of music my peers are listening to as well as the frequency and occasions they do. It was very interesting to see the results come in because I found that music is a HUGE part of a majority of students’ lives on this campus.

I found that students spend around 4-7 hours a day listening to music, which is a lot considering the time required for sleeping, class, etc. On a scale from 1-10 (1 being not important and 10 being the most important), the majority rated music as a 9.

A majority of those I surveyed use Spotify as their preferred music platform, with some using platforms like Apple Music, SoundCloud, or Youtube. It is interesting that of all the different platforms used, they are all streaming services meaning college students tend to use a streaming subscription to listen to their music rather than anything else. These streaming platforms often have deals for students as a means for them to gain more clients while making it affordable at the same time.

As far as favorite genres of music, the results were kind of everywhere. Rap/Hip Hop and Indie/Alternative received the highest amount of votes which did not really surprise me. Rock/Alternative and R&B received the next highest, followed by EDM, then Pop, Country, and then Jazz.

As for occasions of music listening, I found that everyone surveyed listens to music when they study or do homework. Genres listened to while doing this include EDM, Lo-fi, Indie, Instrumental, and others. Results were the same for listening to music while walking to class, getting ready, and driving around in the car. The frequency differed but everyone does listen to music while doing these things. My favorite part of this survey was asking people to explain their music tastes. Some of my favorite responses include:

“All over the place but really good,” “The intersection of what I want to hear and what I need to hear,” and “Anything but country.”

I already knew, based on seeing students walking around, that music is a very big part of most students’ lives on this campus, but this survey really reiterated that.

Written By: Ceceli Riffo-Drecksel

Mac Miller’s Circles Album Review

Not what I expected but exactly what I needed is the best way I could explain Mac Miller’s posthumous album titled Circles, which was released in January.

Though a posthumous album feels eerie it is definitely the closure I, millions of other fans, his family and loved ones, and Malcolm himself needed. Following his death in 2018, I wasn’t sure how to live with the fact I would never see him perform live and would never get to see his career continue to bloom. One of my favorite artists of all time, his music spoke to my soul in ways most other artists haven’t. Miller’s oftentimes heavy yet heartfelt lyrics accompanied by his versatile sounds are some of the reasons I find his music so distinguished. His albums tell a story from beginning to end, something not entirely unique to him but is so well done by him.

His last album released before his death, Swimming, has become one of my all-time favorites and left me wanting more. I wanted to see him come to the resolutions and clarity he was pondering in this album. Circles does the tricky job of tying it all together. Miller was working on Circles with composer-producer Jon Brion at the time of his passing. It is not known how far into this project he got but Miller’s family put their full trust and support into Brion to make the album he would’ve been proud to share with the world.

Surely this task was not easy, therefore Brion should be immensely proud of himself for not only giving us a great album but making one he knew Miller would be proud of. Filled with questions about life, “Does it always gotta, does it always gotta. Gotta be so complicated?”, viewpoints on humanity, “Everybody’s gotta live. And everybody’s gonna die. Everybody just wanna have a good, good time. I think you know the reason why,” and personal notes to self, “No, they don’t like it when I’m down” this album explores the depths of self-discovery, healing, and the shared human experience.

If you haven’t had the chance to give this or his entire discography a listen, I highly recommend you do. Rest in Paradise Malcolm James McCormick. Your impact will live on forever.

Written by: Ceceli Riffo-Drecksel