Electronic House Music: A Concept

In this week’s blog, I am going to focus on my favorite sub-genre of Electronic Dance Music: House Music.

Most of you know of house music from parties, clubs, or festivals. It has a catchy beat that you can’t help bobbing your head or moving your arms to. Others know how to shuffle to this music (I am still learning but I am impressed with everyone who can break out in shuffle).

House music originated in Chicago at a club called The Warehouse in 1977. Frankie Knuckles, who opened The Warehouse, mixed old disco classics and new Eurobeat pop together. Many of these music experiments took place there, and House became the first descendant of disco.

House music is funny to me because there’s usually a couple of words in the song followed by a beat to dance to. It is repetitive, but that’s what makes it fun. It is usually in a range of 115-130 bpm (beats per minute). I know whenever I hear house music in public places, I can’t help but dance to it.

My featured image for this post shows my favorite house DJ, Tchami, during his back to back set with ZHU. This happened this summer at Hard Summer Music Festival. I was in the crowd for this set and it was a huge moment. ZHU and Tchami had never shared the stage before so everyone got to hear their iconic sounds combined.

Tchami usually shares the stage with Malaa, who I saw at EDC Las Vegas last year. I first saw Tchami in 2017 at the Brooklyn Bowl in Las Vegas — I fell in love with house music and I hope to see him five thousand more times.

In this post, I’m going to highlight some of the different types of house music. I will name some artists associated with the each type and some song suggestions to listen to.

Some different types that I am familiar with are Deep House, Bass House, Big Room House, Tech House and Future House.

For some popular house music titles, most of you probably know of these artists and their songs:

Deep House

This type of house music tends to have a lower bpm (around 120 bpm) and has greater influences from soul, jazz, and funk. I intertwine Deep House with Progressive House because they are both very similar. They are closely related to Trance music, as it has long accelerating peaks and troughs that progress throughout the track.

Bass House

Bass house has more baseline while also containing house music elements. It goes much “harder” because of the bass, and is usually around 145-150 bpm.

Big Room House

This is the more mainstream House music. It has lengthy build-ups and releases.

Tech House

This form of house music combines techno styles with house. It has more techno sounding beats with the rhythm of house music. I don’t listen to much tech house but here are some examples I came up with.

Future House

Future house emerged in the United Kingdom around 2010. It fuses deep house, garage house and other elements of electronic music into it. Garage house is known to have pitch-shifted and time-shifted vocals.

These are just a small amount of the many types of House music. This shows how vast the electronic music genre is. I’m still constantly learning about each one and I love to hear the differences. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do!

Written by: Alexandra Gex

REZZ: Beyond The Senses Tour

With her “Beyond the Senses” EP released this summer, 24-year-old Canadian DJ and producer Isabelle Rezazadeh started her U.S. tour this September.

Also known as “Space Mom,” Rezz has her own defining sound in the world of EDM which makes her stand out from the rest. In my opinion, I would call her sound dark mid-tempo bass music or electro bass. It’s hard to place her in a proper genre because she is so unique. Many look up to her as an electronic music artist and producer, especially up-and-coming female DJ’s. Rezz began to DJ when she was only 16, and with the help of stars such as Skrillex and Deadmau5, she released her “Insurrection” EP in 2015 and signed to the Mau5trap label. After that she released her debut with her single “Serenity.”

Fans from all over bought tickets to Rezz’s Beyond The Senses Tour before the full EP was released. She started by releasing one single from the EP called “Dark Age” in May, which she played live a couple of days later at EDC Las Vegas. During this performance, she played another song from her EP that hadn’t been released yet. “Falling” featured Rezz along with the rock band Underoath who also made an appearance onstage, and the single was finally released on June 12. The next single of the EP, called “Kiss of Death” was released on July 12 and featured the artist Deathpact. The rest of the EP, which featured three other songs, was released on July 24.

I drove home to Las Vegas for the weekend to attend her show at the Thomas and Mack Center on Sept. 28. I bought my ticket during the pre-sale back in June, so I had been anticipating this moment for a long time. Rezz was one of the first artists I had listened to when I was discovering the unending variety of electronic music.

I got to the venue very early to find a good spot to stand in the GA section, and I ended up getting– front and center– on the rail. I had only been on the rail for a show on one separate occasion. It was for Snails in 2016 at the Life is Beautiful festival in Las Vegas. I had seen Rezz already twice in the past, and I was not close to the rail for any of them. I knew it was going to be awesome from up close.

It’s crazy seeing one of your favorite electronic music artists in action from up close. You get to see them press buttons and move switches to control what the audience hears and sometimes sees. You also get to see their funny dance moves.

But before I talk about how awesome Rezz was, she had two iconic DJ’s perform before her. First up was the artist BlackGummy. I wasn’t very familiar with his music, but I occasionally listen to one of his tracks called “Plucking Technology.” BlackGummy is the stage persona of Los Angeles producer Iman Marouf. He is also signed to the Mau5trap label, which happened in 2015 along with Rezz. I would say his music is more electro house and dark techno, with some trance. One song I really loved that he played live was called “Superhuman,” featuring vocalist Colleen D’agostino. This was released in 2017. His set definitely had a dark techno/house vibe, and I love house music. I want to see him again and what more he has to offer in a longer set. I really enjoyed his performance and production along with his gummy bear visuals behind him.

Artist BlackGummy, taken by Alexandra Gex

After BlackGummy, the artist known as Peekaboo came onstage for his set. I am more familiar with Peekaboo, and I absolutely love him. Known as Peekaboo, Matthew Lucas is an American producer. He mainly plays dubstep and freeform bass music. He got the crowd very pumped up for Rezz, and he played many songs that electronic music fans are familiar with. I seem to always hear his track “Babatunde” with artist G-Rex at festivals. He played “Motion” and “Maniac” which I was very excited to hear, and even threw in his “Lights Go Down” Zeds Dead and Jauz remix for us. Another well-known song of his that he played was called “Illusion,” which he helped on with the artist Bassnectar. I loved his set and his visuals, and I hope to see Peekaboo live again.

Peekaboo, taken by Alexandra Gex

After Peekaboo finished his set, the backstage team started setting up the stage for Rezz to come on. They put an inclined DJ table up for her on a separate stand which I really liked because sometimes people in the crowd can’t even see the DJ from the back (short people like me). The lights for the stage were already set up, and I noticed right as I walked into the venue that it was very interesting. I watched a video before the tour about how the stage was made, and her team put a lot of work into it. After experimenting with virtual reality over summer, this is what Rezz is known for. Visual artists designed this tour from the ground up. They prepared a full rig, a full video wall, lasers, and her team wanted the art design to be much different than anyone had seen before to give us a new Rezz experience. They wanted to make it as unique as possible– and it was.

Needless to say, seeing Rezz from the rail was EPIC.

Right when she came onstage and her video wall lit up, I was in shock. BlackGummy and Peekaboo were using only a small part of her screen for their visuals and I hadn’t really realized how massive it was. I had never seen anything like it, and from the rail was crazy. She walked up the stairs onto her DJ stand and immediately played “Kiss of Death” from her Beyond The Senses EP.

Rezz, photo taken by Alexandra Gex.

Rezz made sure to play a span of songs from her history. She played tracks such as “Edge” from The Silence is Deafening EP, and “Purple Gusher” (my favorite), “Selector,” and “Melancholy” from Something Wrong Here EP. At the beginning, she played her hit “H E X” with artist 1788-L, and of course “Witching Hour” with the iconic visuals of her staring into a crystal ball. She also made sure to play “Teleportal” which I love to see live. She even played in her set “Creature” by Liquid Stranger and “Blacklist” by artists MeSo and SPADES, which I thought was totally awesome. Towards the end, she also played an unreleased track that she collaborated on with house artist Malaa, which I really liked and I am excited for it to be released. My appreciation for freeform bass and mid-tempo went up after attending this tour.

Rezz is known for her trippy visuals and LED goggles. Her visuals and production were insane, and I am so happy I got to experience her set from close-up. After more than half of the set though, I wanted to appreciate her full stage from farther back. Her set was awesome from any area in the venue and you could see her perfectly as she was elevated on her stand.

At the end of the show, Rezz said, “Okay guys I have one more song for you” four times. This made me so happy. I’m pretty sure that she played some unreleased tracks at the end because I did not recognize some of the songs. But I am happy that she enjoyed the crowd as much as we were enjoying everything she played.

This was the third time I saw Rezz, but it definitely won’t be the last time. She blew me away with this tour and I recommend anyone to go see one of her shows. It is interesting to see how diverse electronic music is, and her sound is definitely different than the rest. It might not be for everyone, but it was very cool to see the production and how her songs were reflected through visuals, lights, and lasers.

Rezz has many future dates for her Beyond The Senses Tour in big cities across the United States. She is also scheduled to play during many festivals at the end of this year. Check out her music here.

Written by: Alexandra Gex
Photos by: Alexandra Gex

A State Of Rave: What We’re All About

The Scene:

Welcome fellow ravers and music lovers of all types! A State of Rave is a radio show that we have created specifically for the newest EDM of today. EDM, or electronic dance music, is often criticized and misunderstood in society, which has earned it a bad reputation in the public eye. It is often put down because of false accusations of ‘talentless’ DJs getting famous from just a computer and for its connection to a drug scene.

We are here to prove these misconceptions wrong and reveal to the world why it still continues to grow and prosper. We want to show the positive ideals and experiences that come from this music and encourage others to make these amazing memories as well. Our one-hour show (Mondays at 9pm) will consist of all types of EDM from trance, dance and house to trap, techno and hardstyle. We find our music by surfing various music blogs and websites such as Soundcloud.com and our love for the scene keeps us in the loop.

Your Hosts:

DJ Walsh: A Journalism and Media Studies major and Marketing minor hoping to incorporate her passion for music and writing into a career in the music or media industry.

DJ Shayna: A second year Journalism major with a huge passion for music, entertainment gossip, and sports. Attending concerts and music festivals (especially with her co-host DJ Walsh) are her favorite activities. She hopes to find a career that includes all of her interests, hopefully in the entertainment field.

Our Experience:

We have attended a wide variety of music festivals from resting on the Indio fields as we listen to the subtle beats of the Sahara tent at Coachella to raging until 4am at OMFG NYE in San Diego. We take pride in the music scene and urge to share it with as many people that will listen. We believe there is a certain magic and wonder to these events that just begs to be heard and felt. We want to constantly radiate the passion and positivity that accompanies this scene. We seek to forever be in a State of Rave.

Here’s a mix to start off, by one of our newest obsessions Gorgon City.

Don’t stop dancing! – xoxo DJ Walsh

 

 

Underappreciated Hardcore Band of the Week: Fail Emotions

Fail Emotions - Renaissance

Ever since electronic (dub-step, drum and bass, trance, etc.) music became popular, hardcore bands tried colliding both genres together like two particles in the Large Hadron Collider. Many bands such as Enter Shikari, I See Stars and The Browning have been able to successfully blend the two styles, but one of the lesser known post-hardcore band who does it phenomenally is Fail Emotions, which is why they’re this week’s underappreciated hardcore band of the week.

(Puts on hipster glasses) This band is so underground their Wikipedia page is in German when you Google, which is strange considering they’re from Yaroslavl, Russia. They’ve been around since 2008, but they seem to keep getting better and better. They just released a new single called New Day Has Come, but their recent album (that’s really an EP) Renaissance is a work of art.

Once I heard their song We Are Legend, I immediately noticed the consistency of the electronic parts. I’m not an expert in electronic music, so I’m not even going to attempt to label them properly (sub-genres are confusing), but Fail Emotions blends heavy breakdowns with the lovable wubs of dub-step quite well. Rather than using it for a 10-second span per song, which is like only putting one chocolate chip in a cookie, Fail Emotions has a huge emphasis on electronic music throughout all their songs.

They’ve got the usual cleans and screams that come with a post-hardcore band, but their ability to sound fresh by varying the amount of singing, screaming, techno, piano, etc. keeps every single song sound unique. If electronic post-hardcore (or trancecore if you want to be hip) is your thing, then head over to Facebook and give them a like.