Students Participate in Nationwide Climate Strike

Person holds "CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL" sign while walking towards the Conrad Prebys Aztec Student Union

Protesters took it to the streets to advocate for more green policies and bring sustainability to the political forefront.

Students gathered to join in on the world-wide climate strike at Hepner Hall on Friday. The march surrounding climate change concerns began shortly after 11:30 a.m. as speakers took to the steps in front of the Love Library and Hepner Hall. The march route made its way from Hepner Hall to Love Library, down the courtyard near the union, and out to the Campanile Walkway ending at the Student Union.

Members from various student organizations including the environmental fraternity Epsilon Eta and SDSU’s Sustainability Club were all in attendance. Other organizations included Veterans for Peace, the Sierra Club, and Lush Cosmetics.

The march had a variety of speakers that ranged from concerned students, faculty, and even congressional hopefuls. Senior, Environmental/Physical Geography major, Taylor Campbell Mosley was one of the speakers. Mosley said that her passion for climate change was centered around learning about non-sustainable agricultural practices and how it takes up two-thirds of the world’s arable land.

“I was a computer science major when I started (at SDSU) and randomly in a religion class, we were talking about indigenous peoples’ land and how a lot of it is used for animal agriculture”

Taylor Mosley

Mosley explained that methane produced was a serious problem affecting our climate, and she made the transition from only caring about plastic waste to looking at the bigger picture altogether.

Common themes at the march included create and enforce an SDSU Green New Deal to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030, establish a Chief Sustainability Officer position in the president’s office to elevate climate as a priority, and finally, design the proposed SDSU Mission Valley site to be carbon neutral.

Echoing chants from the crowd rang in the air, “SD-SU, fossil fuels are not for you” and “we don’t want our power dirty- carbon free by 2030.” Creative signs—most were made from recyclable material—like a surfboard inscribed with, “the oceans are rising, so are we.”

Another common theme of the rally was the disdain towards politicians and their lack of concern toward climate change. Junior Sustainability Major Gabi Medina had a simple message for politicians:

“How can you deny it when there is science that is evidence that this is happening? I also think they are just greedy, that’s why they don’t want to act. As Sarah said up there, it is about money and it’s a huge money game and it’s time that policymakers stop thinking as far as very profit-driven, and they start thinking environmentally driven”

Gabi Medina

Overall the climate strike was a great demonstration where people of all facets came to protest something that they hold very dear to their hearts. The climate may not be fixed by tomorrow, but by judging of the amount of support SDSU has shown for their cause, as well as the support worldwide on this issue, it appears that the future of our climate is in good hands.

The origin of this strike was centered around the efforts of a 16-year-old Greta Thunberg. Thunberg started this movement by going to her parliament each week and protesting by herself, her efforts have helped kickstart climate protests in over 100 cities worldwide. Thunberg made headlines when she sailed across the Atlantic Ocean on a carbon-neutral ship to speak at the U.N. Climate Action Summit in New York. 

Written by: Tom Derig

Bernie Sanders Stops in San Diego for 2020 Campaign Tour; Garners Support From Younger Generations.

Bernie Sanders

On Friday, March 22, Democratic Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders set off his 2020 campaign with a rally in Downtown San Diego addressing economic and social issues to a crowd of more than 6,400 people. This is Sanders’ second campaign visit to San Diego since his 2016 campaign.  Similar to before, the rally held Downtown drew a diverse and energetic crowd of supporters.

The Vermont Senator has been very outspoken about his Progressive policies since his 2016 Presidential campaign trail. Today, Sanders remains a staunch advocate for raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour, universal health care, and free public college as well as significantly reducing student debt. These policies have been popular amongst his followers. Sanders initially directed his speech towards the younger people in the crowd by referencing the need for quality education in the U.S.

“Good jobs require a good education. That is why we are going to make public colleges and universities tuition-free, and substantially lower the outrageous level of student debt that currently exists.”

Bernie Sanders

But Sanders knew his message couldn’t entirely focus on the younger generations. He then honored the historical significance of the rally in an aside.

“Given the fact that FDR was one of the great presidents in the history of our country, I am honored to be here in this very spot 80 years later.”

Bernie Sanders

By the end of the speech Sanders, told the crowd that he has not forgotten his experience of when his family lived paycheck to paycheck, and how he will always remember where he came from.

Janice Ocampo, a USD student, attended the event and said that the rally was important to her. “I am middle class and come from an immigrant family and so I need to understand and have a better perspective on how I fit in in all of this and transform our nation for the better.” Ocampo said.

Ocampo said that Sander’s policies were ideal and feels pretty strong about them, “All of them I really agree with, from immigration, health care, women’s rights and of course public education for us.”

Michelle Mendoza, a 26 year old San Diego resident, stated her ideological connection to Sanders: “What attracts me about Bernie Sanders is that he is one with the people; He understands and also gives good points about what it’s like for the average American not just the one percent.” said Mendoza.

“Thank you for being part of a campaign which is not only going to carry California, which is going to win the Democratic nomination, which is not only going to defeat Donald Trump, the most dangerous president in the modern history of our country – but with your help we are going to transform this country… When we are in the White House, we are going to enact what Franklin Delano Roosevelt talked about… We are going to guarantee a job to everyone who is able to work in this country. We need to rebuild our infrastructure, we need to transform our energy system… There is more than enough work to be done in this country. Let’s go out and do it.” said Sanders. ”

Bernie Sanders acknowledgingthe crowd in Downtown.
Written by: Marco Arreola

KCR News – Facebook Outage

On Mar. 13, around 2 p.m. Pacific Time a global Facebook outage impacted users of the social network platform as well as other Facebook-owned social media such as Instagram and WhatsApp.

SDSU students directly felt the impact of the nearly 24 hour Facebook outage, which is being heralded as one of the largest interruptions the platforms have ever had. Users of the platform reported various problems ranging from being unable to load the site at all, to simply not having the ability to post, like or comment on any material. Justine Saldana, a Senior and Interdisciplinary Studies major, stated she had found out about the dilemma through other social media friends.

“I became aware Facebook and Instagram weren’t working when my fellow food Instagram friends mentioned it early on in our group chat; it was big to them because some of them get paid to post.”

Alejandra Casillas, a Sophomore and Liberal Studies major, became aware of Facebook and Instagram not working while she was trying to post pictures on her social media.

“I was actually trying about 5 times to post some pictures of my day with my boyfriend. It was actually very frustrating because I didn’t know and I thought there was something wrong with my phone.”

Users of the network flocked to Facebook’s social media rival, Twitter, to express their frustrations by using the hashtag #FacebookDown and #InstagramDown. With these tags, users tweeted out and posted memes about the outage. The tweets varied wildly in content, from offering explanations as to why the outage would have occurred, to how people need their social media and how to cope with the current state of their platforms.

Saldana elaborated upon her dependency of the platform for connections both familial and professional;

“I do depend on Facebook a lot to communicate with family and colleagues. For Instagram- not so much. Only because Facebook is a better platform to talk to professional connections… this interruption impacted me directly because I uploaded a picture on my food Instagram and I wanted to see what kind of feedback I was getting from my followers.” 

Casillas similarly revealed her frustration on how she is very dependent on Facebook and Instagram to communicate with those closest to her

“… Sometimes it’s family that I haven’t seen for so long or friends as well and since I don’t have their cell phone numbers I contact them by Facebook or Instagram.”

While Facebook’s services were offline, the company began announcing updates of their current situation via their Twitter account.

“We’re aware that some people are currently having trouble accessing the Facebook family of apps. We’re working to resolve the issue as soon as possible.”

The Instagram Twitter account later proceeded to address its awareness of the “frustration” many users were feeling.

Facebook Outage

Although there were online rumors of the outage being a result of a DDoS attack ( a Distributed Denial-of-Service attack where a hacker floods a site with fake requests to overrun the sites capacity limit), it was later by Facebook that it was not a hacking situation. The company stated on Thursday, that the blame for the outages was due to a “server configuration change that triggered a cascading series of issues” Facebook services are now back online and running.

Written by: Marco Arreola

National Emergency Takes a Toll On SDSU Students

Border wall prototypes being built along the San Diego-Mexico border after the national emergency was called.

On Feb. 15, President Donald Trump declared a national emergency concerning America’s borders; this executive action poses concerns for SDSU students.

Due to the building of the border wall after Trump declared a national emergency, SDSU students who live in Mexico had their morning commutes extended. Dulce Sanchez, a junior and commuter from Tijuana, said her commute has been impacted by the building of the wall due to increased security and lane closures.

This has affected me more as a commuter, because now they close many lanes at the border to be able to revise the cars/persons more in depth, which takes a long time and long lines,” said Sanchez.

Kim Marbella, a Junior and Liberal Studies major, faces similar conditions and is concerned about the national emergency. “I feel like immigration officers have gotten stricter and make slow progress when crossing the border,” said Marbella.

So far Congress has approved 1.4 billion dollars for the wall.  However, under the national emergency, President Trump hopes to get an additional 6.5 billion dollars to fund the border wall. Trump cited the primary reason for the wall is, “…an invasion of our country with drugs, human traffickers, with all types of criminals and gangs.”

Sanchez said that Trump’s reason is unjustifiable, “I believe he is overreacting, but if he feels that building a wall would make the U.S. safer, and a better place, then he has all the right to do what he thinks is better for the country.”

“Unfortunately, to build this wall will cost millions of dollars that could be invested in other areas to help the country,” said Sanchez.

Public Domain: U.S Customs and Border Protection

Additionally, Trump’s views on immigration is another idea that has gained him supporters on the border wall. The wall that would be built would be designed to prevent illegal immigration in the U.S. It has been an idea that has won him many supporters since immigration is a very important issue to many Americans.

Sanchez does not believe that a wall will stop illegal immigration, “People have found ways to cross the border illegally in the past and will continue to find other ways if the wall actually happens.”

A  2018 poll conducted in mid-November found that 59 percent of Americans disagree with Trump’s plan to build the wall. Additionally, the poll cites that 79 percent of Republicans support the wall.

In a New York Times article, on Feb. 18, 16 states challenged President Trump’s emergency declaration for the funding of the border wall.  A federal lawsuit was filed in Federal District Court in San Francisco by states ran by Democratic governors, except  Maryland. The suit argues that the President does not have the authority to redirect funds for the wall when Congress is the ultimate and final authority on government spending.

Mabella said that the national emergency is ridiculous, “He [Trump]  is wasting his time and taxpayers money on a foolish national emergency when sincerely nothing of actual emergency is happening.”

Written by: Marco Arreola