Aztecs Come Up Short Against Utah State 23-17

San Diego State was defeated by Utah State 23-17 on Saturday night at SDCCU stadium. For the Aztecs, it was a classic case of too little, too late.

The Aztecs had multiple streaks snapped tonight. They had a 13 game winning streak in the month of September snapped as well as a 10 game winning streak against the Aggies snapped. 

The Aztecs only scored three points in the first half and trailed by 17 at halftime.

However, a late game spark brought the Aztecs within striking distance. After struggling for most of the game, senior quarterback Ryan Agnew threw two touchdowns in the fourth quarter and cut the Aggies’ lead to six with just over five minutes remaining. He would finish with 281 yards and two touchdowns. 

One of his fourth quarter touchdowns was an across-the-body throw to sophomore Kobe Smith for 25 yards.

Quarterback Ryan Agnew attempting a pass.
(Photo: Justin Neeley)

“That was a miracle at that point.” Agnew said, “[I] Dropped back and they played like a prevent defense so nothing was really open. I tried to buy enough time, try and find the open guy and Kobe [Smith] made a play.”

The Aggies had an opportunity at a 42-yard field goal with 1:18 left in the game, but kicker Dominik Eberle missed the kick, which kept the margin at six points instead of nine. 

On the Aztecs final drive of the game, the offense failed to find the endzone and turned the ball over on downs.

“We had a play drawn up to get one across the middle,” Agnew said, “Wish I stayed in there a little longer [the pocket] and tried to deliver the throw, got to give the receivers a chance.”

SDSU led this one early with a slim 3-0 lead, but a crucial first quarter interception put the Aztecs behind the eight ball. Agnew was picked off by Shaq Bond who returned it for a touchdown.

The turnover was not the only thing that hurt the Aztecs. The team had six penalties for 61 yards, including an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty. SDSU eclipsed their average penalties and penalty yards in the first half.

SDSU running back Jordan Byrd.
(Photo: Justin Neeley)

“Obviously the special team’s penalties always started us in bad field position,” Rocky Long said, “I haven’t seen them on film to see if they were legit or not, but we’ll find out. I think the only real bad penalty was we got a personal foul penalty and that’s ridiculous.”

The Aggies have racked up 1,330 yards in their first two games but were held to 375 total yards against the Aztecs.

“If you told me before the game we were going to hold them to 16 points on defense I’d tell you we were going to win,” Long said.

However, Long quickly critiqued his defense after the praise. When asked about how his defense played, Long did not hold back.

“Not good enough,” Long said. “It’s never good enough if you lose. We gave up some yards, but we made them kick field goals and I think they scored one touchdown on offense.”

The Aztecs were without contribution from senior running back Juwan Washington, who hasn’t played since week 1. He continues to suit up, but remains on the sidelines during games.

Asked if anything good came out of tonight Long didn’t mince words.

“Well, there’s no real positives because we lost,” he said. “I still believe our team can be a good football team and maybe we were okay tonight too because Utah State is pretty good, they got an NFL quarterback and that’s a hard thing to contend with.”

The Aztecs will look to gather themselves over their upcoming bye week and prepare for an away game against Colorado State.

Written by: Daniel Farr

Students Participate in Nationwide Climate Strike

Person holds "CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL" sign while walking towards the Conrad Prebys Aztec Student Union

Protesters took it to the streets to advocate for more green policies and bring sustainability to the political forefront.

Students gathered to join in on the world-wide climate strike at Hepner Hall on Friday. The march surrounding climate change concerns began shortly after 11:30 a.m. as speakers took to the steps in front of the Love Library and Hepner Hall. The march route made its way from Hepner Hall to Love Library, down the courtyard near the union, and out to the Campanile Walkway ending at the Student Union.

Members from various student organizations including the environmental fraternity Epsilon Eta and SDSU’s Sustainability Club were all in attendance. Other organizations included Veterans for Peace, the Sierra Club, and Lush Cosmetics.

The march had a variety of speakers that ranged from concerned students, faculty, and even congressional hopefuls. Senior, Environmental/Physical Geography major, Taylor Campbell Mosley was one of the speakers. Mosley said that her passion for climate change was centered around learning about non-sustainable agricultural practices and how it takes up two-thirds of the world’s arable land.

“I was a computer science major when I started (at SDSU) and randomly in a religion class, we were talking about indigenous peoples’ land and how a lot of it is used for animal agriculture”

Taylor Mosley

Mosley explained that methane produced was a serious problem affecting our climate, and she made the transition from only caring about plastic waste to looking at the bigger picture altogether.

Common themes at the march included create and enforce an SDSU Green New Deal to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030, establish a Chief Sustainability Officer position in the president’s office to elevate climate as a priority, and finally, design the proposed SDSU Mission Valley site to be carbon neutral.

Echoing chants from the crowd rang in the air, “SD-SU, fossil fuels are not for you” and “we don’t want our power dirty- carbon free by 2030.” Creative signs—most were made from recyclable material—like a surfboard inscribed with, “the oceans are rising, so are we.”

Another common theme of the rally was the disdain towards politicians and their lack of concern toward climate change. Junior Sustainability Major Gabi Medina had a simple message for politicians:

“How can you deny it when there is science that is evidence that this is happening? I also think they are just greedy, that’s why they don’t want to act. As Sarah said up there, it is about money and it’s a huge money game and it’s time that policymakers stop thinking as far as very profit-driven, and they start thinking environmentally driven”

Gabi Medina

Overall the climate strike was a great demonstration where people of all facets came to protest something that they hold very dear to their hearts. The climate may not be fixed by tomorrow, but by judging of the amount of support SDSU has shown for their cause, as well as the support worldwide on this issue, it appears that the future of our climate is in good hands.

The origin of this strike was centered around the efforts of a 16-year-old Greta Thunberg. Thunberg started this movement by going to her parliament each week and protesting by herself, her efforts have helped kickstart climate protests in over 100 cities worldwide. Thunberg made headlines when she sailed across the Atlantic Ocean on a carbon-neutral ship to speak at the U.N. Climate Action Summit in New York. 

Written by: Tom Derig

Sexcapades: Review of Life’s Work: A Moral Argument for Choice

Sexcapades

Sexcapades reviews Dr. Willis Parker’s Life’s Work: A Moral Argument for Choice, followed by a discussion on abortion.

Life’s Work: A Moral Argument for Choice is a memoir outlining Dr. Willie Parker’s journey to becoming an abortion doctor and reproductive activist. Seamlessly blending his strong Christian beliefs, love for medical science and the philosophy that a woman’s body is her own, Dr. Parker eloquently encompasses what it means to be a Good Samaritan. 

As an African American growing up in the Deep South during the height of Civil Rights Movement, Dr. Parker’s words strongly imitate those of Dr. Martin Luther Kings—a role model of his. Dr. Parker’s rise from adversities like poverty, racism, and being raised by a single mother was extremely moving. His tenacity radiated throughout every word, sentence and chapter. There was not a time in reading this book where I did not feel moved or was awed in some way.

As I mentioned, Dr. Parker has faced a lot of adversities. He grew up in Wylam, Alabama in a small, impoverish neighborhood. Many people who grow up in communities like his do not see a way out. While, Dr. Parker had a lot of role models to look up to but he also faced a multitude of racism and community doubt that he would succeed. For example, Dr. Parker was told by a guidance counselor to become a carpenter because he said he liked to work with his hands. Despite his doubtful environment, Dr. Parker was consistently dedicated to his religion and education. He has graduated from Brea College in Kentucky and has received degrees from the University of Iowa College of Medicine, the Harvard School of Public Health, the University of Cincinnati, and the University of Michigan. 

I was initially intrigued by how Dr. Parker’s Christian faith would factor into his profession and activism.

To be honest, before reading the book I thought Dr. Parker would completely abandon his faith when he began his practice of abortions and activism. I scolded myself after reading the book because that is a very ignorant ideology. Dr. Parker’s religion is not separate from his line of work and activism. It fuels and empowers it. Dr. Parker and his book showed me how he uses Christianity to empower women, their sexuality and dreams. His interpretation of his religion is beautiful, eye-opening and definitely differs from the way ‘pro-lifers,’ or antis as he calls them, use Christianity to push their controlling and hatred agenda. 

What I loved a lot about the book is Dr. Parker’s inclusion of stories of women he has encounter in his line of work. It is what I found to be the most de-stigmatizing of the entire book. These women have dreams to be successful too. According to Dr. Parker’s book, most women who are seeking abortions are women who come from a low socioeconomic background. These are the women who have to scrape every penny together to have an abortion. Their limited access to safe abortions is because they have limited access to good health care and insurance. Some women are likely to have no insurance at all, some have other children at home, some are beaten by their husbands and some are teenagers. What all of these women have in common is that they have dreams too, they have hopes, desires and realities.

Dr. Parker’s book puts it in perspective how detrimental restrictive abortion laws are to women who need them.

Dr. Parker calls out how unconstitutional U.S policies are on abortion and how lawmakers are shutting down abortion clinics making it harder for women to seek them out. Twenty-seven states in America have imposed waiting periods between twenty-four and seventy-two hours for women to get abortions. This waiting period is between the initial visit for counseling and consultation and the actual abortion appointment. Every minute a woman delays her abortion the price increases because she moves farther along in her pregnancy. Dr. Parker says policies like the waiting period is financially disabling women who may already be living under or around the poverty line. The book cites calculations from ThinkProgress that if a woman in Wisconsin wants to terminate a first trimester pregnancy after you factor in gas, taking off of work, child care expenses (if she has children at home), and the waiting period that it would cost her over one thousand dollars.

Financial instability causes a huge issue because some states may only allow first trimester abortions, thus, making it harder for women to receive an abortion. Due to the harsher and stricter policies being enacted by states some women are forced to bring a pregnancy to full term. These laws are robbing women of their reproductive freedom and possibly making them more financially unstable than they were before:

“According to data from Planned Parenthood, more than one third of women having abortions in the second trimester said they delayed because they needed time to raise the money.”

Dr. Willis Parker (102)

Mississippi has a ban on second trimester abortions, Dr. Parker tells a story of a young woman who was thirteen weeks pregnant and needed time to scrape together extra money. By the time he saw her again the gestational age of the fetus was sixteen weeks and one day. Dr. Parker was not able to perform an abortion because she was now in the second trimester of her pregnancy. The best he can do for women in this situation is inform them of other clinics that are allowed to second trimester abortions but sometimes they way over state lines.

A consequence of harsh restrictive laws are the dwindling number of abortion clinics in the United States.

In the states where abortion clinics are disappearing and there are more restrictive policies, surveys found that Google searches in DIY abortions spiked. For example, in Texas between 2012-2015 the number of abortion clinics has decreased from forty-one to seventeen. DIY abortions are extremely dangerous because these women may take illegal medications, homeopathic remedies and even worse trying to perform their own abortion with household items like a coat hanger. Dr. Parker says women who take illegal pills put themselves at extreme risks, especially if it doesn’t work. Dr. Parker says these laws force women into corners and then ultimately make the decision for them by making it a very public and political battle.

“It is extremely dangerous for anyone to take unidentifiable pills for any reason, and if one woman was brave enough to enter my office having pursued that course, then there are many others who are not.”  

Dr. Parker Willis (105)

As a feminist and a person that stands on the “pro-choice” side of the abortion argument, I believe that if a woman does not wish to be pregnant it is ultimately her choice to terminate it. I chose this book because I wanted to hear a perspective from an OB-GYN who perform abortions. Reading Life’s Work: A Moral Argument for Choice has changed my life and increased my beliefs that a woman reproductive choices are entirely up to her. Dr. Willie Parker is an inspiration and truly embodies what it means to be a Good Samaritan. I would totally recommend this book to everyone, even if you are not ‘pro-choice,’ it puts abortion in the perspective about it can empower and help women in our society. I believe because advocates like Dr. Willie Parker the stigmatization of abortions can be greatly reduced. 

Written by: Julie Cappiello
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KCR’S Coachella Survival Guide

Coachella 2018

Haven’t started packing yet? Don’t worry – KCR’s got you covered. Here are the best tips and tricks to survive Coachella 2019!

There are few things better than spending a weekend in the desert with good friends, good music, and even better vibes. If you’re going to Coachella this year, get ready to have fun, but always remember to be safe and come prepared.

FESTIVAL ADVICE:

With headliners like Childish Gambino, Tame Impala, and Ariana Grande, be prepared for big crowds and even bigger performances. First off, always remember to bring a positive attitude and enjoy everything that comes along with the festival; no one wants to hear complaints while you’re at one of the biggest and best events of the year. Overlapping set-times can be frustrating, but our best advice is to decide in the moment who you want to see and just go with the flow. Festivals are more enjoyable with friends, so stay close to people you trust and remember that every artist has something great to show you.

The heat can be brutal, but staying hydrated is key! Your first stop after entering the festival should always be the hydration station. Thankfully, Coachella has always kept their water prices at $2 ever since they first started, so make sure to stock up on some H2O.

Next, confirm a meeting spot. Whether it’s next to one of the unique art installations, a lemonade stand, or the side of a stage, a meeting spot is necessary in case you get lost or plan to meet up with friends at a later time.

WHAT TO BRING:

  • Portable Charger
    • Taking videos of your favorite bands takes up more battery than you’d think. Also, Coachella is known to have spotty service, so make sure you charge up so you can find your friends.
  • Camelback
    • Vibedration has some stylish backpacks that will keep you hydrated throughout the day. Amazon also has some reliable finds, like this one.
  • Fan
    • A hand fan is trendy but also a necessity. If you think you’ll get tired of waving your hand to the beat all day, stick to a battery powered fan. With the mister included, you will be surprised how refreshed it’ll leave you.
  • Hydrating Sunblock
    • We’ve all had our awful sunburns, and the last thing you want is to burn the first day and be uncomfortable for the rest of the weekend. Apply sunscreen before you go, and bring some into the festival as well. Yes, they do allow sunscreen inside the venue!
  • Bandana or scarf
    • The dust can be absolutely brutal! Make sure to cover your nose and face for protection, unless you want to breathe in dirt all day.
  • Earplugs
    • Obviously, the music will be LOUD! And if you do decide to camp, there is no guarantee that your neighbors will follow the noise rules.
  • Small blanket
    • Standing on your feet all day can be tiring, and being able to sit on a small blanket is one of the small things you’ll appreciate. It also gets cold and windy at night, and having a portable blanket will make your walk back to your site a little more tolerable.
  • Comfortable shoes
    • While you might want to flex your newest and trendiest shoes in the desert, the festival is huge and you will be walking all day. Stay comfortable at all costs to survive the weekend.

And finally, make sure to download the official Coachella app on your phone to get all the latest updates on set times, official rules, and fun activities that are happening throughout the weekend.

CAMPING:

If you’re not one of the lucky ones staying in a house or hotel, you’re probably camping. However, camping is half of the fun and the perfect experience for any first-time Coachella go-er. Make sure you come prepared though, because once you’re at the campsite, it can be difficult to leave and buy things you may have forgot. Thankfully for you, I’ve prepared a list of things to pack if you’re camping.

Besides the basic necessities like a tent, canopy, sleeping bags, and all your clothes and toiletries, here are some packing suggestions you might not have thought about:

  • Cooler
  • Foldable table & chairs
  • Lanterns & flashlights
  • Blow up mattress or mattress pad
  • Battery powered fan
  • Portable grill
  • Portable shower bag
  • Bathing suit and towel for showering
  • Speaker
  • Games for the campsite
  • Battery powered string lights
  • Tapestries
  • Picnic blanket
  • Wet wipes
  • Toilet paper
  • Paper towels
  • Mini first-aid kit
  • Energy drinks
  • Non-pershiable food
  • Water!!!

When it comes to camping, it is always better to over-pack rather than under-preparing. You might be surprised by how cold the nights can get, so make sure you bring blankets, sweatpants, and warm jackets. If there’s a chance of rain, pack a tarp to cover your tent and a couple of rain jackets to be safe. Think through what your daily routine looks like and what you’ll need to bring to keep yourself staying comfortable.

Not going? Don’t worry!

Both weekends will be live-streamed on yt.be/coachella, where you can watch all the live Weekend 1 performances and see original, curated content during Weekend 2. Watch from the comfort of your home and avoid standing in the heat all day. And don’t worry, there will be many more Coachella’s. If you plan on going a future year, I suggest buying tickets during their presale and utilizing the payment plan. In the end, you will most likely have the opportunity to see these artists again for a much cheaper price.

Need a playlist for the drive up? Check out my Coachella 2019 playlist here.

Written by: Brittany Roache