Sdyle: Madison Santos

Today I was at the library and ran into the lovely Madison Santos. Madison is a Sociology major here at San Diego State, and she for sure dresses with spunk. We had a chat about some of her style inspirations, views on trends and how to dress with a difference by adding your own flavor. This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Are there any people or profiles that give you inspiration?
I do, I follow a lot of photographers mostly, and then some models who I think have really good fashion sense. This is one one of my favorite profiles: shoptrendyandtipsy. I am actually making a top similar to this at the moment:
via shoptrendyandtipsy's Instagram

Do you often recreate your own clothes? 

Yes, and no. I am really skinny and a lot of clothes don’t fit me the right way. So I sometimes have to redo clothes to make them suit my body type. If I have extra fabric left over, I like to make little tube/tank tops or whatever.

One time I didn’t have any pants so I stole my boyfriend’s jeans, cut them, took them in at the sides, and made them into high waited shorts and they looked really cool.

What are some of your favorite places to shop in San Diego?

I guess there is nothing specific to San Diego, but I mostly shop at Brandy Melville, and when I can afford it, at Urban Outfitters. I also like a lot of boutique stores because I love clothes that people can’t find. I hate it when I buy something from Forever 21 and then see five people wearing the same thing. It’s nice having some individualism. I buy a lot of stuff when I go out of the country, too.

Do you have a favorite brand?

It definitely changes, but I am into things that are cottony, soft and cozy. I am starting to get more into ‘pretty girl grunge’ or ‘hipster girl grunge’ type stuff.

What’s one piece of clothing you have made the biggest splurge on?

There was this one time with my step dad when we were going to a funeral and he was trying to make things seem happier. My sister and mom had also gone away on holiday and I couldn’t go. So we went shopping at Nordstrom and I tried on a dress that he let me get. I get scared to wear it in college though, because I feel like everything we do is very sloppy and I don’t want to damage it. I haven’t had a chance to wear it a lot since I got it [in high school], but I’m sure I can still I can still rock it.

“I don’t really like wearing dresses and skirts… because I like to sit like a guy”

What’s your favorite staple?

I am definitely into skin tight leggings or sweat pants and then just a cozy tiny little tank top— that’s like my go to. I don’t really like wearing dresses and skirts… because I like to sit like a guy.

If you could swap wardrobes with anyone in the world, who would it be?

I can’t think of anyone in specific but definitely some boutique stores— and I would wear every single thing in the whole store.

Do you have anything that you want to share with everyone reading this?

I would say learning to dress to your body type is really important because your clothing is a way of expressing yourself. I take a lot of pride in the individualism that I put into my clothing and outfits. I also notice people who express themselves through clothing, so it’s a good way to connect with people. Everyone can look good; you don’t only need to look like skin and bones– like me– to look good. There are some things that I can’t pull off because I’m not curvy enough. Whatever you have, just flaunt it and be confident! It’s definitely a confidence booster to wear your clothes and feel good in them. You feel comfortable because you are finally being yourself.

I’m all for new trends, but I also like to make them my own. You should make it your individual thing—otherwise that’s just basic.

Check out Madison’s Instagram @ m.a.a.dycity

Get rocked: Behind the scenes of two campus movements

I had the pleasure of interviewing two campus leaders about two major initiatives taking place at SDSU : Sarah Bentley (California State Student Association Advocacy Officer) and Carmel Alon ( Vice-Chair of the External Relations Board of Associated Students). These women shed light on the Aztecs Rock Hunger and Rock the Vote campaigns happening for the duration of October through mid-November. The interviews originally aired on kcrlive.com during the Tuesday morning news show Coffee and Tee.

ROCK THE VOTE

Both Sarah and Carmel are heavily involved in political advocacy efforts for higher education. Regardless of party affiliation, they encourage students to register to vote. Rock the Vote is a segment hosted through the External Relations Board of Associated Students, but their work does not stop after October 24th (the deadline to register) or November 8th (election day). ERB works throughout the year to propose legislation, address campus-wide or CSU-wide issues, and represent the students of San Diego State within local and statewide political spheres. ERB will also be hosting events to increase voter knowledge about measures and propositions within the California ballot. A local plan proposed by the College Area Community Council that is directly applicable to San Diego State Students calls for a raise in the Community Assisted Party Program fine from $1,000 per household resident, plus the landlord, to $10,000 per resident on the lease.  Students have the ability to sit in on these college area meetings, and certainly have the ability to vote on any local legislation that arises. Students can register to vote through the AS website link, or during any one of the tabling events this week.

AZTECS ROCK HUNGER

Sarah is the very literally the voice of the Aztecs Rock Hunger campaign, as it is her voice you hear in this video that was sent to students to kick off the  2016 food drive. From this video, and the ARH website, it was made known that food insecurity is prevalent on this campus. The funds collected will directly benefit the Jacobs and Kushman Food Bank, but 20% will also be allocated to SDSU students in need through the economic crisis team. There are five ways to donate that include cash donations through the Aztecs Rock Hunger venmo account, collections during tabling initiatives, opportunities to donate at all Aztec Market Shops and campus Starbucks, online at the ARH website and physical donations of non-perishable items to the red bins located throughout campus. Aztecs Rock Hunger has a goal of raising 400,000 pounds of food for the local San Diego community, with a one dollar donation equivocating six pounds of food. Election cycles often leaves students feeling discouraged, or motivated to get involved and make a difference in their community. This program, as mentioned by Sarah and Carmel, is a great way to hone in on the latter. Aztecs Rock Hunger will last through mid-November, and more information can be found on their website, or any of their social media pages.

Classic Rock for Dummies

Need a beginning lesson in classic rock and roll? Look no further.

Just as classic books such as Great Expectations and Pride and Prejudice are important to the history of literature and therefore shoved down innocent fifteen year olds throats, there are several artists that are essential to the history of rock and roll and should be shoved down your throat. Before we get to the playlist, here are a few *trigger warnings* for those who may consider themselves enthusiasts of rock:

  • I am anti- Beatles. I don’t really care how much you like Yellow Submarine, I’d prefer to be above ground. There is no denying that the Beatles definitely made an impact on music history, but in my blunt opinion, they suck.
  • The fact that you sang all the words to “Don’t Stop Believing” at a frat party does not make Journey a good rock band.

There are several other artists that could be included in a more extensive playlist (If your curious check out The Beach Boys, The Rolling Stones, Blue Oyster Cult etc.). This playlist was made assuming that the listener has little to no knowledge of classic rock and does not have hours and hours at their disposal for listening.

  1. Back In Black- AC/DC

I’m 99.99999% sure that you have heard this song in some way, shape, or form over the course of your lifetime. AC/DC is the definition of sex, drugs, and good ‘ol rock ‘n roll. They are definitely a great artist to dive right into when beginning to listen to classic rock.

  1. Tom Sawyer- Rush

Rush is that nerdy guy from your high school that has no friends, but eventually becomes your boss. Their innovative sounds were considered weird at first, but then they skyrocketed into rock stardom.

  1. Surrender- Cheap Trick

Surrender is another song that you’ve probably heard before, but may not have known the artist. Remember that early 2000’s Eddie Murphey movie, Daddy Day Care? Surrender was actually played “live” in the movie by Cheap Trick. Cheap Trick has several other rock classics including “I Want You to Want Me” and, in my very important opinion, is one of the most underrated classic rock bands.

  1. Show Me The Way- Peter Frampton

I’ve inserted a photo of the one and only Peter Frampton as the title image, to show you what a 1970’s sex god looked like. Just a little bit different than Zac Efron or Ryan Gosling. No matter what your taste in romantic partner, Peter Frampton is no doubt a rock god. His use of talk box, which is defined by Wikipedia as a “unit that allows musicians to modify the sound of a musical instrument by shaping the frequency content of the sound and to apply speech sounds (in the same way as singing) onto the sounds of the instrument”, is incredibly satisfying.

  1. Life In The Fast Lane- Eagles

Eagles are an American classic if there ever was one. The recent passing of Glen Frey has brought the Eagles old tracks up a bit more. This particular song choice is a good listen if you are feeling rebellious.

  1. Panama- Van Halen

Van Halen underwent lots of changes during their run as a rock band; still they remain a staple to this list.

  1. Achilles Last Stand- Led Zeppelin

One of the longest Led Zeppelin songs (just over 10 minutes), “Achilles Last Stand” includes the one critical element of a truly perfect rock and roll track, an infinitely long guitar sequence.

  1. Mary Jane’s Last Dance- Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

While many will credit Free Fallin’ as Tom Petty’s greatest song, it’s me, so I’ve got to veer off from the typical choice a little bit. That’s where Mary Jane’s Last Dance comes in. This song inspired me to learn how to play harmonica because of the sick (excuse my out dated so cal terminology) use of harmonica. Other than violin, harmonica is my favorite supplemental rock instrument.

  1. Purple Haze- Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix is absolutely one of the most gifted guitarists that ever lived. I gave you a beginner track, but if you catch feelings for Jimi check out his rendition of the star spangled banner live from Woodstock.

  1. More Than a Feeling- Boston

This is by far one of the most well-known classic American rock songs of all time and is most definitely Boston’s most popular track. I have more than a feeling about Boston, if you know what I mean.

 

Whether or not you agree with my choices, there’s no doubt that if you are a rock and roll beginner, these are some pretty solid training wheels.

Follow me on Spotify @kelseydonahue14 to check out this playlist here: https://open.spotify.com/user/kelseydonahue14/playlist/2U3eHujXAQuHUQFHbglnFG

I’m live Mondays from 10-11pm on KCR with The Road Less Traveled!

The Sounds of State-Scott Granlund and Jared Kleber

Just yesterday, I met up with Scott Granlund and Jared Kleber at their apartment to record my final interview of the semester. Scott is a coworker of mine at KPBS and mentioned to me early this year that he was starting a radio show, I’m glad I was able to squeeze he and his cohost on at the very end. I hope you can tell as you read but this was a very fun interview, one of the best I’ve had in my opinion. Scott and Jared have great chemistry and made it a fun conversation. Scott talks almost as fast as he thinks while Jared’s more measured pace somehow fit neatly together. It made transcription pretty hard but I really wanted to capture the spirit of the conversation for my last interview.

A reminder one last time: I try to transcribe the conversation as it happened, to capture the cadence and structure of our speech I put grammar in a secondary role. So without further ado, here is the final interview of the semester:

Cameron Satterlee: Alright, I am with Scott and Jared, welcome guys, thank you for being on.

Jared Kleber: Thank you.

Scott Grandlund: Thank you, sir.

CS: So, what is your radio spot?

SG: Our show is called the Family Garage, we play garage rock, psychedelia, proto-punk, new stuff, old stuff, the time is ten pm on Sundays and it’s an hour long show. And we talk about random stuff too.

CS: Alright. You’re getting ahead of me, man.

SG: I’m sorry.

CS: No it’s cool. It’s a good answer. So how long have you guys been with KCR?

JK: This will be the end of our first semester.

SG: Yeah this is the first semester we’ve had this show. And we weren’t there before.

CS: How did you guys partner up?

SG: Well we live together, and we’d been talking about doing a show together for I want to say a year, we wanted to do it sophomore year and then we never really got our act together. And then finally we were just like (claps hands) apply online let’s just do the thing, and we kinda sat there like “what should we play?” It was literally one night, cause we knew we wanted to do a show together just to do something different and do something new. We were literally just sitting on the couch saying “what should we play?” And we just kinda workshopped it then and thought of this idea of playing garage rock; kinda a blanket genre where we could do a little bit of everything. And we thought we’d talk about stuff in between songs and we tend to talk about a lot of weird stuff.

CS: Alright well that sounds pretty interesting. You said you kinda just pulled out garage rock sorta randomly, how come you decided on that specifically?

JK: I think we were originally—I think we had talked about it—we were at a record store and we were listening to garage rock and I was like “we should just do that” because it’s kinda a blanket genre. A lot of things can classify themselves as garage rock. You can play stuff from the 60’s and onward and it wouldn’t really matter if it’s not particularly garage, it could be a little punk, it could be a little psychedelic. It’s kinda a nice blanket genre for rock music which I don’t think gets a lot of play anymore, so it’s pretty nice.

SG: Yeah that’s right. I think the record store thing especially. What we were just hearing while we were in Off the Record, in our apartment, at Thrift Trader and stuff just is nice, “I wanna do that.”

JK: Yeah we wanted to play music that you don’t really hear anymore.

SG: Yeah.

JK: You would only hear it if you went and found it yourself or you go into a record store and you’re talking to some old guy at a record store and he’s like “you should listen to this.”

CS: Well maybe it’s fitting that you guys are on Sunday with the alumni shows cause they play a lot of stuff kinda like that too.

SG: Keeps with the theme I guess.

CS: Uh huh. So I guess you sorta answered this already, but I wanna know a bit more in depth I suppose what made you want to do the radio and be rock DJ’s?

JK: Well we are both film students and I think we understand media quite a bit.

SG: Yeah.

JK: And I think that radio is just another form of media and I think that it’s interesting and not as big as it used to be and it’s kinda something that’s still interesting to me. I know we both are people who listen to a lot of podcasts. And I think that a lot of people assume that podcasts are the thing that’s gonna kill radio or something like that. But it’s different, and the idea of a medium where you don’t have to see something and you can just learn new things and hear new things is always interesting to me.

SG: Yeah I would agree. I think that we were just kinda interesting in another form of broadcast really. Especially with the kind of music that we ended up playing, it worked out really nicely. It’s an old kind of medium that we can showcase this music that is old and classic too. Just the idea of the radio show, that there’s two people who are controlling what you’re listening to and you hear their comments about it and what their takes on the world are. In that respect, for the podcasts especially, you’re just hearing what people think about stuff. We just thought why not put our opinions out there.

CS: Cool, yeah that’s great answers you guys. So you guys mentioned it earlier but you play this garage rock because it allows you to play different kinds of music from a long period of time. Is there anything recent that you play?

SG: Mac DeMarco.

JK: Mac DeMarco.

SG: We play some Mac DeMarco, we play some Walter TV.

JK: Black Lips. The Garden. Death Valley Girls. I feel like it’s weird, smaller stuff.

SG: FIDLAR, once. So it’s just smaller, more punk-y bands. We played a bunch of Alabama Shakes a lot on our show too cause they have a new album out. So I mean, it’s more of that blanket theme where “yeah, this is some kind of rock, alternative thing” so let’s play it. So it’s really stuff we like too.

JK: It’s all stuff that’s really small. You wouldn’t hear most of the bands we named on the radio. Those people survive online or on college radio.

CS: You guys are doing your part then!

SG: It’s just our civil duty.

CS: (laughs) Yeah broadcast it out. So you guys are roommates and have known each other for a while now, would you say you have good chemistry on the air?

Both: Yeah.

SG: We met in orientation actually, before college actually started. He was one of the first people I met and we talked for a while, we made our schedules right next to each other, and we ended up having the exact same schedule freshman year. We had every class together and we ended up living in the same dorm hall three door down from each other. So we’ve been friends for a long time now, and then we moved here to our current apartment and we’ve been living here for two years, and we’re living together next year too. So there’s good chemistry. A little good back and forth every once in a while, we sync up and say the same word at the same time and it’s kinda funny. I dunno, it works, works for us.

CS: Hey cool, I know exactly what you mean cause I met my cohost at orientation too.

SG: Really?

CS: Yeah, fun story. So, last question, I always like to ask this, how would your perfect show go? Just an ideal, perfect hour. How would that be?

SG: Well we’ll do a music news, coming down the pipe section, and then we’ll do a random this is what’s going on in our lives talk, and then we’ll do a random here’s a thing that’s happening in the world usually. So the craziest thing in the world, if there’s a lot of great music news to talk about, some funny weird stuff happened, and some weird stuff that happened in our lives that are funny to talk about and then all that. And then every other week we actually have “bi-weekly double shot,” we made a sound bite for it, we play two of the same artist back to back. So I guess if we have a really good playlist for the night and just things that flow well and then it could also tie in well with some of the music news. I dunno, every once in a while we hit our stride and we’re kinda funny at the same time we hit it. We’ve had some good shows.

JK: I think an ideal show would also have guests, we’ve had guests on to also talk about sports for ten minutes.

SG: For no reason.

JK: Because we don’t know sports as much, so it’s kinda funnier. Because you can do a sports show, but it’s kinda funny if you do a sports show and you don’t know sports, you don’t do sports very much. You just kinda have your weird own views on it so I think that’s kinda interesting. We always talk about hip hop news on our show.

SG: Yeah that keeps happening.

JK: We don’t even do a hip hop show but we do hip hop news. And I feel like our listeners probably don’t like that but there’s not a lot of garage rock news. There’s more hip hop news.

SG: We actually addressed that on our first show. I’m sorry, this answer has gone kinda long.

CS: It’s fine.

SG: But we kinda addressed that on our first show. We said we can talk about garage rock news but all it would be like would be “these guys got a new EP out, they’re touring 16 places you’ve never heard of, it’ll cost no money and ten people will go to the show. Yeah they’re not gonna do anything too weird.” Meanwhile literally we had three shows in a row where we had news about the rap group Migos because they kept getting into a whole lot of trouble. That was like our Migos news segment.

JK: Like stabbing people.

SG: Either stabbing nine people at an Albany concert.

JK: They got arrested for guns.

SG: Arrested for guns at the University of Georgia. They’re just doing weird stuff.

JK: They’re crazy so every week we check up on Migos basically to see what they’re up to because they’re insane.

SG: So it’s more fun to talk about them and then we’ve got some funny things that happened last minute like Mark’s mom’s show was funny.

JK: Yeah we found that one of the cohosts of the show the hour before us, his mom always listens.

SG: To our show.

JK: And she was picking him up one time and she was like “I like your show. Much better music than my son plays.” And we were like “shouts out to Mark’s mom.”

SG: We were just talking about her on air, it was really cool. Even if it’s ten people that listen, it’s great to hear that we have the one Mark’s mom. Mark’s mom likes our show!

JK: Yeah some mom somewhere likes our show, it’s pretty cool.

SG: Yeah, so we do it for Mark’s mom.

CS: (laughing) Alright.

SG: That wasn’t really an answer to your question much, I guess it kinda was.

JK: Our ideal show would have five minutes devoted to Mark’s mom.

SG: (laughs) A guest, maybe two.

JK: A guest of some kind.

SG: The Migos literally just blew up the state of Idaho.

JK: A Migos section.

SG: I dunno how much we could squeeze in. I guess the funny part of our show is that what we talk about never matches the music.

JK: No.

SG: We’ll talk about the music but our conversation has nothing to do with it.

JK: We’ll be like “hey did you hear about this thing?”

SG: “Anyway, FIDLAR coming up next!” Yeah. So there you go.

CS: Oh man, well that—

SG: You can take whatever you want of that, please don’t feel like you don’t have to translate all of that.

CS: No that’s cool. That was actually really awesome. Thanks guys.

SG: You’re welcome.

So there you have it, Scott Granlund and Jared Kleber. Again, I thought it was a great interview. Scott and Jared are clearly taking full advantage of what KCR has to offer as a way to express a unique vision on the radio. You only have one more opportunity to tune into their show this semester: Sunday at 10 pm. But I’m betting they’ll make a triumphant return to the online airwaves next semester.

This was not only my final interview of the semester but I believe it will also be my final interview for the Sounds of State. I may return next semester to the KCR blog, but I am retiring from this project. Thank you all for reading, it has been a pleasure.

-Cameron Satterlee