SDSU Wins Old Oil Can 17-7 Over Fresno State Bulldogs

Fresno State traveled down California to obtain the “Old Oil Can” trophy, but the Aztecs weren’t having it. 

If you took San Diego State University -1 and the under, congratulations. SDSU won 17-7 on Friday. 

As usual, SDSU was stout defensively. The Aztecs held the Bulldogs to only 70 rushing yards and only allowed them to convert 13 first downs. In fact, the Bulldogs were a porous 3-12 on third down (25%).

“We deserved to win the game,” Head coach Rocky Long said, “It’s a really very good win for our team, program and puts us one step closer to where we want to be.”

SDSU controlled the ball for 12 minutes longer than Fresno State did, and ran 30 more plays. 

“If you keep their offense off the field, they cant score points.” Senior quarterback Ryan Agnew said. “We have to get more points on the board so then the defense isn’t stressing.”

However, the Bulldogs claimed an early lead. Running back Ronnie Rivers was able to find the end zone and give Fresno State a 7-0 lead.

A big interception by SDSU’s Tariq Thompson set up the Aztecs inside the Fresno State 25-yard line. Two plays later, the Aztecs benefitted from a defensive pass interference and Chase Jasmin scored from the two yard line to tie the game. 

The Aztecs’ defense remained the story, as junior Luq Barcoo intercepted the Bulldogs. The junior college product has seven interceptions this season, which is tied for second in the nation. 

“We make it a competition of us getting plays,” Barcoo said, “So it’s kinda cool to see other guys make those plays and we’re just trying to make those plays.”

Meanwhile, SDSU has 85 interceptions since the start of the 2015 campaign, which is most in the entire nation during that span.

Safety Dwayne Johnson Jr. made it known he’s currently in last place for the team’s friendly competition.

“I got to get one, I got to get one.” Johnson Jr said, I’m in last place right now, but we’re always trying to make to plays to help us win.”

The Aztecs ran into some bad luck toward the end of half one. Senior quarterback Ryan Agnew was intercepted by Fresno State, but the Aztecs defense held tight and forced a Bulldogs punt.

Not too much later, Agnew found tight end Parker Houston for what looked like a touchdown, but it was overturned and SDSU settled for three points.

Right before the first half ended, the Aztecs had a field goal blocked, which kept the lead 10-7 at halftime. 

The Aztecs were marching to start the third quarter, but Chance Bell fumbled inside the three-yard line, which gave the Bulldogs possession again. It was the first time the Aztecs lost a fumble this season; the score remained 10-7.

At the very beginning of the fourth quarter, the Aztecs decided to go for it on fourth down from the Bulldogs two-yard line.

Agnew rolled out of the pocket and found Jasmine for an easy touchdown, which pushed their lead to 10. It was the first time Jasmine scored multiple touchdowns in one game.

The senior quarterback finished with a career high in completions (33) and passing yards (323). He finished with a quarterback rating of 130.7.

After the Bulldogs found some momentum halfway through the fourth quarter, they had a touchdown called back, then Barcoo intercepted Jorge Reyna once again to seal the deal.

It was the third turnover the Aztecs caused on Friday, they are 22-0 when forcing three or more turnovers. 

“This year we’re doing a much better job of taking the ball away,” Long said

The Aztecs are now (8-2; 5-2 Mountain West). They travel to Hawaii next week, kickoff will be 3 p.m. PST. 

Written by: Daniel Farr

NEVADA UPSETS #24 SDSU 17-13

San Diego State entered Saturday’s Mountain West matchup as a 17.5 point favorite over Nevada and the over/under was 39 total points. The Aztecs (7-2, 4-2 MW)  did not cover the spread or win, as they fell 17-13.

For a very slow-paced, low scoring, and defensive game — the ending did not disappoint. The fourth quarter began with a 10-10 tie.

With 12:53 left in the game, SDSU went for and converted a fourth and one from their own 17-yard line, however, a holding penalty called it back and forced them to punt.

Nevada’s first play after the punt was an end around reverse pass that gained 50 yards and set up the Wolfpack inside the SDSU 10. On second and goal, the Aztecs were called for defensive pass interference and it set up a Wolfpack touchdown run, which pushed their lead to seven.

Down 17-10 with 3:47 left in the fourth quarter, SDSU decided to kick a field goal on a fourth and seven, which made it a 17-13 game. “It’s not an easy call, but it’s not a bad call. “Head coach Rocky Long said.”I would do it again.”  It arguably bailed Nevada out.  

SDSU had nine penalties for 79 yards obviously did not help their case. “Way too many penalties, that’s an undisciplined football team and that’s my fault.” Long said.

A third-quarter passing touchdown by the Wolfpack expanded Nevada’s lead to 10-3, but the Aztecs and Chance Bell responded with a 14 play 71-yard drive. Bell ran in a three-yard touchdown run, which knotted the game at 10 with 1:24 left in the third quarter.

The first two quarters saw seven punts, six points, two red zone interceptions, and one Aztec ejected. Junior safety Trenton Thompson was disqualified for targeting early in the game. 

The Aztecs had an incredible scoring opportunity just before the first half concluded. However, senior quarterback Ryan Agnew threw a red zone interception with 1:06 remaining in the half. Before the interception, SDSU had just converted a fourth and one which set them up inside Nevada’s 15-yard line.

The first half was a defensive slug fest, ending in a 3-3 tie. Both teams had trouble finding yards and points throughout the half. In fact, the Wolfpack were held to negative-three rushing yards and did not convert a single third down in the entire first half. 

The Aztecs moved up to No. 24 in the Associated Press Top 25, which was released Nov. 3. It’s hard to see them still ranked after this week, but the Aztecs have another game at home next Friday against Fresno State,

“They’re probably pretty miserable and we’re miserable,” Long said. “Next week one of us will feel much better and the other will feel just as bad or worse.”

Written by: Daniel Farr
Photo by: Justin Neeley

21 Questions: Diana Pastora Carson

woman in front of building

Diana Pastora Carson is a kindergarten teacher and one of two lecturers for General Studies 420: Disability & Society.

“I suppose the question “Tell us about yourself” is overwhelming because there is not enough time to tell you about me which includes all that I am, do, have, love, and have experienced.”

So, tell me about yourself?

“I was made in Spain, born in Maryland, but grew up mostly in San Diego. My father was in the Navy and got permanently stationed here because, at the time, San Diego was the only place that had a school for children with autism. I have many roles: an educator, an author, a public speaker, a disability rights advocate, a mom, a sibling, a daughter, a wife, a friend, a middle-aged woman exploring what it actually means to be ‘herself.’ 

Recently, I have tried not to think so much about how people view me anymore. However, in all honesty, although my awareness of this has greatly evolved over the past few years, I’m not as secure as I want to be. It still does make me feel validated and proud when others think favorably of me. It is a journey toward full self-love. But I’m enjoying this journey and look forward to experiencing freedom from preoccupation with opinions of others. 

I have noticed that people usually think I’m sweet all the time. But in reality, I’m a pain in the ass to my family. I’m really picky about things at home and I’m not always very patient when family members don’t follow my ‘rules’ of cleanliness, order, etc. I do truly enjoy being with people though and learning about their lives. I appreciate people, their journeys, their identities, their struggles, their empowerment, and their victories.” 

Are you family-oriented?

“Yes, very family-oriented. I am especially close to my brother, Joaquin, who experiences significant autism. He is my next-door neighbor and I see him daily. He was institutionalized for a total of 15 years. But my family fought for his return to the community and after a 3-year legal battle, we won, and he is now home. My family’s life revolves around him and his wellness and peace within.”

Who are you listening to right now? 

I listen to Miguel Poveda, Sam Smith, and reggaeton on Pandora. I also listen to lots of podcasts on keto, women’s health, disability, inclusion, and business.

Do you have an idea of where you will be at the end of this year?

“I’ll be enjoying a break between semesters! Also, I’ll probably be excited over the release of a new book I’ve written for educators. It is about how to teach disability awareness from a perspective of dignity and empowerment. I’ll do some gardening in honor of my mother in her memorial garden at my home. I’ll get to sleep in more too.”

What’s on your mind today?

“I’m focusing on how to maximize my health, listening to podcasts on the ketogenic lifestyle. I’m also focusing a lot on how I can shift from teaching elementary school and focus more on a speaking/consulting business after my retirement. In general, I’m mentally planning for a future of health, wellness, and abundance.”

If you could tell your younger self something what would it be?

Don’t believe everything you think. Don’t take yourself so seriously. Enjoy each day. Breathe. Be who you are. Take care of your physical and mental and spiritual health. This life is a journey.
Written by: Jasmine Alexander
Photo by: Jasmine Alexander

21 Questions: Lizzy Havey

Inspired by Humans of New York, this is 21 Questions; a fun way of getting to know the students, faculty, and staff of SDSU. This week is Lizzy Havey.

“My name is Elizabeth Rose Havey. But I usually go by Lizzy. I was named after my grandma, who ironically changed her name to Eleanor because she didn’t like to be called ‘Lizzy’. She is still my favorite person to this day. Oh, and I am from Sacramento, California (916).”

How do you feel about the question, “Tell us about yourself?”

“Unwell. I tend to babble when I hear this question. I think of every interview I ever had and how I have probably changed my answer to best fit the interview scenario. A smart move on my part, but is it noble? Eh, probably not… however, get that money right.”

So, tell me about yourself?

“Ah, just a small-town girl living in a lonely world. No, but I am 22 years old and a fifth-year student at SDSU. I came to SDSU because I really wanted to experience living in both Northern and Southern California. In my free time, I like to read poetry, sweat via biking/cycling, dancing, or a boxing class. If I had more open weekends, I would probably plan more camping trips. I’m passionate about environmental justice, policy, travel, unpopular opinions, satisfying videos on Snapchat, and frozen yogurt. I’m a Pisces if you couldn’t tell.”

“I was once told that I am a ‘charismatic leader’ I appreciated that, so I like to mention it sometimes. At my job as a waitress and in the field of customer service people view me as pleasant, “smiley”, and friendly. But in other settings, people tend to think I am unapproachable. I want people to know that I am approachable, and I do care about others, even from the slightest interaction.”

“I am always happy when I dance. Playing my favorite song over and over makes me happy. Live music whether at a karaoke bar, a restaurant, a music festival, or anywhere in between also makes me really happy. Right now, I am listening to Summer WalkerLana Del Rey’s new albumPrince (all the time),  and Paulo Londra.”

What’s on your mind today?

“Today, I’m thinking about pain, loss, the number of tasks I need to do for my student organization, and I’m thinking of a friend who is struggling right now as well as personal boundaries. Aside from those thoughts, my day is good. My day is very good actually. I am winding down after a day of work and 2 canceled classes. I feel surrounded by friends and I am really looking forward to going to my internship tomorrow.

If you could tell your younger self something what would it be?

Nothing is ever just black or white. Also, eat the whole row of Oreos and have a second bowl of ice cream if you want it.