Movements at the OC Observatory

Movements performed a sold-out show at the Observatory Orange County on Friday, April 19.

With alternative rock groups alongside Movements including Drug Church, Trash Boat, and Boston Manor, Movements managed to put on a memorable act that shows their growth as musicians as well as their appreciation for their loyal hometown fans.

Orange County’s Observatory, in comparison to the North Park location, was a bit too claustrophobic for my liking. For one, the venue was entirely general admission but consisted of terraces that spaced out the crowd into awkward sections. Second, the pit was simply too tiny for the number of people wanting to mosh, crowd surf, and just have that full concert experience. The crowd was stuffed like sardines but this did not put a damper on their energy for the openers. Unfortunately, I missed Drug Church and Trash Boat’s sets, but Boston Manor’s performance easily made up for it and got me excited for the rest of the concert.

An Emo and pop-punk band from across the pond, Boston Manor is hands down one of my favorite groups to watch live. Henry Cox is an excellent frontman with the vocal abilities to match which showed in their opener “Flowers in Your Dustbin” from their latest release Welcome to the Neighbourhood. Backed by talented musicians, Cox kept the crowd moving with their hits like “Halo” and “Lead Feet,” angst-driven anthems that warmed up fans for the main event.

Movements exploded in popularity upon releasing their debut album Feel Something in 2017.

Since then, they’ve toured with big-name players in the scene such as Knuckle Puck, Citizen, Turnover, and The Story So Far. The band opened with “The Grey” which describes the feeling of slipping into a cold and lonely depression. Frontman Patrick Miranda, who is open about his struggles with anxiety and depression, is unafraid to speak on mental health issues in his lyrics. Next up was a fan favorite “Colorblind” which had the audience pushing, shoving, and loudly singing along. Miranda is known for his colorblindness, consistently making note of it in other songs like “Deep Red” which is a personal favorite of mine. This song starts off with a catchy bassline, worked by Austin Cressey, that punches through the guitars and vocals. The chorus is ear-wormy in and of itself with a break down that allowed the band to let loose on stage.

Movements is a SoCal band that grew up in Rancho Santa Margarita who, despite their rise to fame in the scene, have not forgotten their roots. This show specifically was a sign of gratitude to the fans that have stayed with them all these years. Patrick reminisced to the time they opened for the band Basement in the same venue. In 2015, they performed in front of 300 people. Today, they sold-out a well-known music venue, playing in front of an audience who truly cares about their art.

The end of the show was bittersweet. Movements came out to a crowd chanting their name and finished with the classic “Daylily.” As the song reached its crescendo, Patrick raised the mic to the audience as they sang “‘I think it’s time you had a pink cloud summer'” back to the band. The group felt at home and living the dream.

Written by: Rica Perez

Turnstile at The Observatory North Park

Turnstile photo taken from Paranaense87. 

Turnstile performed at The Observatory North Park in San Diego alongside Razorbumps, Reptaliens, and Turnover on Wednesday, April 10.

Razorbumps has an indescribable sound that meshes spirited 80’s punk rock with lo-fi vocal effects. Vocalist Jenn held a magnetic stage presence that drew in fans and casual listeners who wanted to experience an eclectic rock performance.

Reptaliens, on the other, had to be the most confusing yet entertaining band of the night. Living up to their Portland origins, Reptaliens kept things weird when one band member came out on stage in an eyeball costume. Despite their outlandish choice of attire, this group’s sound is much more mellow with synth-driven melodies and bright vocals which were sung by Bambi Browning. Overall, the performance was underwhelming, saturated with repetitive basslines and unmemorable instrumentals.

Turnstile, a hardcore band from Baltimore, Maryland, brought the heat and opened with their newly released track “Real Thing.” The aggressive guitars set the tone for a hard-hitting track that claims happiness is a mere imagination. Turnstile played nonstop; no breaks, no talking, just pure rock. And the crowd ate it. During songs like “Fazed Out” and “Blue by You,” audience members moshed, kicked, and slammed into each other in the pit. Against the venue’s advice, the throngs of crowd surfers also livened up the show.

The group recently dropped their newest record Time & Space under their first major record label, Roadrunner Records. This album incorporates the unorthodox, DIY hardcore principles of their previous works on Nonstop Feeling and Step to the Rhythm, which takes influence from Rage Against the Machine and the likes, and a more developed sound. Time & Space does not stray far from their roots as they surprisingly meld the familiar punchy guitars with high energy funk and soul.

For someone who has only skimmed the surface of the hardcore scene, Turnstile is a refreshing band to witness live. The straight-to-the-point nature of the show allowed fans to focus on the music without the frills of decorative stage decor, political rants, and gimmicks. It’s purely punk. Hardcore is not for everyone but I still highly recommend checking out Turnstile’s music or catching a show because I know everyone has a little angst they want to let out.

Written by: Rica Perez