Game of Thrones Live at Viejas Arena

Game of Thrones Live at the Viejas Arena was a phenomenal experience which allowed fans to relive all the highlights from the series.

If you don’t watch Game of Thrones… you are definitely missing out! After the concert, my excitement for season 8 has reached unprecedented heights. For those unfamiliar, German composer Ramin Djawadi is the mind behind all the beautiful, heartbreaking, and intense scores we hear during the show that always leaves us wanting more.

In addition to his work on Game of Thrones, Djawadi attended Berklee College of Music, worked with Hans Zimmer. and even won an Emmy for his work on the Season 7 Finale “The Dragon and the Wolf.” His contributions to Game of Thrones are embedded within the show’s DNA; Just as the characters and houses have evolved over time, so too has his themes. For example, Daenerys Targaryen’s theme started small, but became progressively more powerful after each season. Daenerys has proven herself to be a “Khaleesi” to many, so it’s only fitting her song grew with her. Her theme was initially built with only a cello, and has progressed into the powerful and strong song that it is now. During the concert, as Daenerys became stronger, she would say ‘dracarys’ and the stage would glow in flames.

Djawadi conducted an 80-piece orchestra along with a local choir. The set up included a screen that projected the show and multiple stages that separated parts of the world in the series. There was a stage dedicated to King’s Landing and one to Winterfell, with the Iron Throne directly in the middle.

Several soloists surrounded the stage, each dedicating their mastery to a specific song. Violin soloist Molly Rogers performed the House Stark theme while ascending into the air with a huge dress on, as rose petals fell from the sky! Some instruments were even specially crafted for the tour, including a 14-ft Wildling horn, which was used during a scene on the attack of the Wall. A lovely soloist brought fans to heaven (and tears) when they heard “The Rains of Castamere.” With scenes as heartwarming as Ygritte and Jon Snow’s cave scene, to the bloody and heart wrenching The Red Wedding, you are thrown headfirst into the very best moments of Game of Thrones. As “The Light of the Seven” was playing, the whole audience held their breath knowing the Wildfire was about to be lit. I intensely cried during a specific scene of Hodor’s (if you know, you know) as my fellow KCR member Peter Swan comforted me.

During the show, Djawadi even admitted that he had to write the music for season 7 before the writing for the show was even released. He also acknowledged that putting together the Game of Thrones Live Tour took over 3 years. This means they were continuously adding the music as the show was being released!

I am extremely lucky to have had this opportunity to see Ramin Djawadi in action and the unique experience of how the series was brought to life. If you ever have the opportunity to see or hear Djawadi’s work, whether from Game of Thrones, or any of his other work, I strongly recommend it.

Vinyl of the Week – Introduction

I don’t know if you know this, but KCR is kind of a big deal. It’s been around since 1969, and was one of the premiere college radio stations in the nation. In its heyday, roughly 1975-1990, KCR received record service from dozens of major labels, as well as vinyl submissions from countless local bands. The albums would arrive at the station, DJs would listen to them, pick what they liked, and play it on their show. Some of it was music that eventually got picked up by mainstream stations and is still known and loved today, but much of it has faded away, never breaking the college radio circuit or simply going out of style.

When music shifted to primarily digital format, promotional records became promotional CDs. At KCR, like other radio stations, decades of vinyl albums got locked up and forgotten and clunky turntables put in storage to make room for new, more user-friendly methods of playing music on air.

(image via kcralumni.org)

(image via kcralumni.org)

(image via kcralumni.org)

(image via kcralumni.org)

(image via kcralumni.org)

(image via kcralumni.org)

(image via kcralumni.org)

(image via kcralumni.org)

(image via kcralumni.org)

(image via kcralumni.org)

What this means for us at KCR in 2014 is that there are a whole lot of vinyl records stored away, many virtually untouched since the year they were released. And I’ve been possessed by the Spirit of DJs Past to catalogue it all, making me KCR’s Head of Inventory.

There are over 15,000 vinyl albums in the collection. I’ve only scratched the surface cataloging them so far, but I’ve already found so much mind-blowingly amazing music that I can’t bear to keep it to myself. I want to tell you about it! But writing about music is like dancing about architecture, as the saying goes – it’s nearly impossible to evoke the characteristics of one form of art through another. So I’m not gonna try! What I’m gonna do in this weekly column, Vinyl of the Week, is tell you about the neat albums that I find and why they’re so neat. I’m not a critic, I’m just a fan of old music and appreciator of vinyl. You can judge them for yourself – I’ll be linking a recording of each album I write about.

This column will be incredibly biased. I’m picking whatever albums I find and fall in love with to write about, so they’ll be specific to my taste. Lucky for you, I have good taste! Right now I’m mostly into ‘70s and ‘80s punk, so expect a lot of that. Albums that stand out to me from the collection are local records, rare records, valuable records, underrated records, records by bands that only released one album, and records that look particularly beat up (meaning well-loved!). Also, most of the records have comments from KCR DJs written on them from when they were first released. I’ll listen to anything that’s highly praised or fawned over (there were some ‘80s girls with a SERIOUS thing for Nick Cave). Some albums I choose will be somewhat well-known. Others may only have 100 copies in existence. Everything will be good.

I can’t wait to share all this great music with you! Check back every Wednesday for a new post.

Photo by Danielle Quinones

Photo by Danielle Quinones