Aztec takes advantage of class lectures at local beer festival

San Diego State’s Bryan Coburn, a student within SDSU’s Business of Craft Beer program, took what he has learned in the classroom into the field at the 5th Annual Bankers Hill Art & Craft Beer Festival at The Abbey on Fifth Avenue on Friday.

Loaded with a bevy of local beers and bites, The Abbey, a 10,000 square foot venue, played host to north of 300 people in attendance to sample a diverse selection of San Diego breweries and Bankers Hill native restaurants.

The city of San Diego, known for its slew of stunning breweries and equally tantalizing restaurants, was on full display at the well-attended event, allowing Coburn to seize the moment.

“To try all of these beers and all of this food in one place is such a great experience,” Coburn said. “I hope this continues for a long time.”

Of the 15 breweries represented at the festival, Second Chance Beer Company and Karl Strauss were two of several select breweries to draw significant crowds to their tableside.

Offering three different beers, Second Chance Beer Company drew local San Diegans in with their Belgian Style Golden Ale, but they kept coming to refill their two-ounce glasses with the brewery’s Rye IPA, a darker, bitter beer with a notable bite.

Karl Strauss’ Aurora Hoppyalis IPA also made its way into a lot of glasses on Friday night, as its hoppy, smooth taste served as a positive surprise to a number of guests in attendance.

Unlike a majority of the people filling their glasses, Coburn was able to understand each select pour on a much deeper, educated level because of the work he has done at SDSU.

“I think [all of the beers] would taste the same if I didn’t know what I know about beer,” Coburn said. “I have learned so much about beer since starting the program, and I’m happy it’s helping outside the classroom.

“[The program] has found a way to make beer taste better.”

Coburn, however, didn’t limit his tongue to the range of beers present at Friday’s event, as he also took it upon himself to try a number of the samples prepared by Bankers Hill’s very own restaurants.

Cucina Urbana, located at 505 Laurel Street, offered a tasteful mascarpone polenta topped with a savory ragu, leaving those nearby no choice but to take a break from the beer to dive into its creamy decadence.

Pizzicato, a close neighbor to The Abbey on Fifth Avenue, had attendees waiting patiently for more samples of their thin-crust pepperoni pizza after they ran out of samples within the first hour of the three-hour event.

“I’m not going to lie; I had more than a couple slices of the pizza,” Coburn said.

Balancing beer with the array of awe-inspiring snacks, Coburn found it easy to enjoy himself at Friday’s event and plans to attend again next year if Bankers Hill pushes their annual total to six in 2018.

A Week of Miracles

miracle week

Aztec Dance Marathon is one of hundreds of Children’s Miracle Network Dance Marathon events that take place across the country (and Canada). Each of these dance marathon efforts benefit a local Children’s Miracle Network Hospital, this one being Rady Children’s of San Diego. The year long initiative comes to fruition at the overnight dance marathon where participants or,”dancers” are on their feet for 15 hours in honor of and celebration for the kids who cannot. They have raised over $120,000 for the hospital in just two years on campus, making them the highest fundraising philanthropic organization at SDSU.

miracle week

SDSU’s Aztec Dance Marathon celebrates a week of astonishing achievements as the highest fundraising philanthropic organization on campus

While the third annual official event is scheduled for February 2017, this week offered a series of events on campus promoting their mission, values, purpose, and encouraging students to join the movement. Miracle Week can be closely compared to a homecoming week of sorts. It was presented as a time to unify students under one cause. The week began with an inspiration day where members of ADM wore and distributed gold ribbons to celebrate awareness for childhood illness. With an initial goal of registering 250 new dancers and raising $10,000 throughout the entire week, they astonished the campus as the organization went above and beyond all expectations. On recruitment day the group managed to oversee over 1,000 participants who created an online fundraising page, pledging their commitment to collect funds and participate in the event this spring. Education day was a time to really get down to the core of dance marathon and the patients it serves. Members of the organization hosted an event in the Aztec Student Union with giveaways, music, and an opportunity for anyone interested to learn more information.

miracle week thermometer

This is the final thermometer posted from the Aztec Dance Marathon social media pages, although I’m sure a new total will be revealed at the end of the 24 hour mark.

With the fourth day of Miracle Week: Fundraising Day rapidly approaching, fundraising chair Mackenzie Kahl was nervous about maintaining the momentum of the week throughout this “Push Day.” She confessed that the burden of reaching such an ambitious goal of “Five K in One Day” was weighing heavily on her, but she had faith in her team and the dancers they recruited. In one day alone…and really just about 12 hours, the organization raised an overwhelming $13,000. These thermometer posts were revealed throughout the day, keeping followers updated on the stance of their efforts. The overall goal of dance marathon is $101,000 and the final fundraising total will be revealed in the final hour of the overnight event on the morning of February 25th. There is still another day left in Miracle Week, focused on offering recognition and appreciation to registered dancers and everyone who has contributed to the cause. For more information about Aztec Dance Marathon, or if you want to contribute to the cause, feel free to visit their Facebook page or any of their other social media accounts.

Get rocked: Behind the scenes of two campus movements

I had the pleasure of interviewing two campus leaders about two major initiatives taking place at SDSU : Sarah Bentley (California State Student Association Advocacy Officer) and Carmel Alon ( Vice-Chair of the External Relations Board of Associated Students). These women shed light on the Aztecs Rock Hunger and Rock the Vote campaigns happening for the duration of October through mid-November. The interviews originally aired on kcrlive.com during the Tuesday morning news show Coffee and Tee.

ROCK THE VOTE

Both Sarah and Carmel are heavily involved in political advocacy efforts for higher education. Regardless of party affiliation, they encourage students to register to vote. Rock the Vote is a segment hosted through the External Relations Board of Associated Students, but their work does not stop after October 24th (the deadline to register) or November 8th (election day). ERB works throughout the year to propose legislation, address campus-wide or CSU-wide issues, and represent the students of San Diego State within local and statewide political spheres. ERB will also be hosting events to increase voter knowledge about measures and propositions within the California ballot. A local plan proposed by the College Area Community Council that is directly applicable to San Diego State Students calls for a raise in the Community Assisted Party Program fine from $1,000 per household resident, plus the landlord, to $10,000 per resident on the lease.  Students have the ability to sit in on these college area meetings, and certainly have the ability to vote on any local legislation that arises. Students can register to vote through the AS website link, or during any one of the tabling events this week.

AZTECS ROCK HUNGER

Sarah is the very literally the voice of the Aztecs Rock Hunger campaign, as it is her voice you hear in this video that was sent to students to kick off the  2016 food drive. From this video, and the ARH website, it was made known that food insecurity is prevalent on this campus. The funds collected will directly benefit the Jacobs and Kushman Food Bank, but 20% will also be allocated to SDSU students in need through the economic crisis team. There are five ways to donate that include cash donations through the Aztecs Rock Hunger venmo account, collections during tabling initiatives, opportunities to donate at all Aztec Market Shops and campus Starbucks, online at the ARH website and physical donations of non-perishable items to the red bins located throughout campus. Aztecs Rock Hunger has a goal of raising 400,000 pounds of food for the local San Diego community, with a one dollar donation equivocating six pounds of food. Election cycles often leaves students feeling discouraged, or motivated to get involved and make a difference in their community. This program, as mentioned by Sarah and Carmel, is a great way to hone in on the latter. Aztecs Rock Hunger will last through mid-November, and more information can be found on their website, or any of their social media pages.