Buying Concert Tickets Secondhand Sketches Me Out

In 2016, tickets to EDC Las Vegas sold out before I got the chance to buy my own. At that point, I accepted the fact that I didn’t get my ticket and planned to just go to EDC Las Vegas 2017 instead (which I did).

However, curiosity hit me and I started looking through the EDC lineup. With names such as Martin Garrix, Armin van Buuren, Deorro, Alesso and Tiësto, I knew I had to find tickets somewhere. I started looking through Craigslist for people near my area who were selling their wristband for two days (EDC Las Vegas only sells 3-day wristbands), and it was a challenge. 

First of all, I had to find a person and make sure that they weren’t sketchy, which was a very difficult thing to do. Also, most people on the site ask for a deposit so they can have a form of assurance that you won’t back out – and that’s something I’m hesitant to do. But, I couldn’t find anyone who was willing sell me their wristband without a deposit, so I decided to go along with the precedent.

I found a woman from San Diego who was selling her wristband for the last two days. We set a day to meet up and were ready to go forward with the transaction. But then, an idea popped into my head. Since she was asking for a deposit, I should create a way to cover my a** – just in case she doesn’t follow through.

So, I wrote a contract covering every single loophole I could possibly think of, as well as consequences if any form of fraud were to occur. And, I included that I would require a picture of their I.D.

I contacted her and said I wrote a contract for the transaction so that I too could have some form of security. To my surprise, she did not agree to it and started acting all sketched out. She backed out of the transaction, leaving me without a potential EDC wristband.

I started looking through Craigslist again and decided to try it one last time. This guy from San Marcos was also looking to sell his wristband for the last two days and asked for a deposit for his wristband along with my social media.

I didn’t mention the contract that I made for the deal immediately, because I wanted to see his terms first. I then texted him saying what security I wanted. I sent him my contract and he actually agreed to it (upon some amendments to be made)! To my surprise, he was impressed by it, and thought that I was some lawyer because of the apparent complexity of the legal document I drafted. We agreed to meet up, and we signed the contract, took pictures of our I.D. photos and then I gave him my deposit.

At this point, I was relieved and hoped that I had placed trust on someone that wasn’t going to try to screw me over. Then I played the waiting game. It was a whole month of thinking about the worst possible scenarios and outcomes.

June finally arrived and it was time to drive to Vegas. I contacted the seller once I arrived, and he didn’t reply. I went to the location he told me to meet him at (his hotel) and he wasn’t there. I started worrying and was stressed out of my mind, because not only did I give him my money, but the sole purpose of my Vegas trip was in jeopardy (I was 19 back then so there wasn’t much to do).

An hour later, I got a text notification. It was from the seller, apologizing. He didn’t reply or show up because he had had a wild night, and wasn’t awake on time. He came down from his room to meet up with me and then gave me his wristband.

I did it! I was going to EDC Las Vegas!

Best of luck to any other dedicated fans just trying to go to a show. 

Gustavo Cristobal

Journalism Major at SDSU.