Noname at The Observatory North Park

Noname

This past Saturday, March 16th, Noname performed at The Observatory North Park in San Diego.

This was Noname’s last stop of her North American Room 25 tour, celebrating the release of her second album, “Room 25.”

The show started off with another Chicago based rapper, Elton. Before, I had never heard of Elton, although seeing him on stage performing made me want to know who he was. Elton brought a certain charisma that drew you too him. He performed with such energy and mojo that made the crowd want to vibe to his music and incredible voice. Elton got the crowd grooving with him throughout his performance, clapping along to his songs, chanting with him, and snapping to the beat. At one point, Elton even began crowd surfing. Elton displayed a certain amount of control with the audience, talking or moving then the crowd reacting back to him. Towards the end of the performance you could see how Elton brought out the audiences’ energy, as he got the whole place grooving with him.

After Elton, the lights slowly dimmed until all you could see was the luminescent sign on back of the stage shining bright saying, “ROOM 25,” while the whole crowd began to scream waiting for Noname to come out. Suddenly, the music began and out came Noname singing along. She was incredible, and you could see that she was having fun as she performed on stage talking with both the band and the audience. Whereas a lot of artists seem to put on a front, Noname seemed to be genuine, acting like her “true” self.

She performed songs from both her first debut album, “Telefone” and her latest album “Room 25.” She even performed her recently released single “Song 31.” It was beautiful hearing her perform, the amount of talent that she displays as a lyricist and artist is incredible. Hearing her perform her songs and the crowd singing along with her made for a fun Saturday night. Everyone in the crowd grooved along with the music and the amazing flow, talent, and comfort that she displayed on stage made you want to sit back and enjoy the show.

Sadly all great things have to come to an end, after the show Noname left the stage and the theater went dark. Fortunately, she came back to perform one more song after everyone began to scream out “Encore.” After finishing out the night with her last song, Noname said her final goodbye and thanked San Diego for coming out for seeing her that night. And thus marked the end of her North American Room 25 Tour.

Written by: Sam DeLeon

Rocket Con at the Scottish Rite Event Center

Rocket Con

Last weekend the annual San Diego Rocket Con attracted cosplayers and comic book fanatics over to the Scottish Rite Event Center.

This year the Comic Convention has expanded to a two day weekend to showcase art and comics for the community. Chase Lirley originally started the idea of Rocket Con along with his dad after visiting other cons themselves and thought they would put their own spin on it while supporting local artist.

“We love supporting local artists, and we love supporting the local community because we want to be a local con. But at the same time, it’s been great this year because we reached a little further. We got people from Vegas, people from Arizona, all coming in and selling things so even if someone were to go to every single Comic-Con in San Diego, they would get to see newer things here.”

Chase Lirley

Local artists also showed appreciation for the opportunity to show off their art. Emerald Moss, AKA Milky Art, has always had support, but just needed the platform to show off the art she created.

“When I was younger I didn’t even think I could go to conventions. I didn’t think that was something within the realm of possibilities. Before, I really wished I could do something like that, and you know what, my parents, my mom, and my grandma, they were there my whole life and they were really supportive from the moment I told them. Even when I asked ‘Do you guys I think I could do something with my art?’ they were there behind me”.

Emerald Moss

Benjamin Baakar, head of Vandal Priest, thinks that conventions are important in other ways.

“Conventions are very important. We do a lot of networking online and that’s cool but you want to be in front of the people. You want people to have hands-on experience with your art… Seeing it on a screen is cool, but seeing it in person, having it tangibly in front of you, that’s where you get that real connection… If your not owning your craft then you need to be learning something towards your craft “

Benjamin Baakar

At the convention, many of the comic books featured one key character: Wolverine from the X-men comics. This was a character that Joe Rubinstein has drawn many times. Rubinstein came to the United States at an early age and found a love for comics after seeing the collection and the passion his older cousins had for the medium. Rubinstein began his career at the age of 11 in New York as an assistant and worked his way up until he got his first professional job at only 17 with DC Comics. At 19, he transferred over to Marvel Comics. While speaking about his experience of being an artist, Rubinstein stated:

While you should be your own artist and have your own taste, pretty much everything you’re doing has been done before. And don’t reinvent the wheel, learn the lessons of the Masters and never forget that everything is based on reality. Try and study real life. Real people. Real everything… I’ve been brought to Kuwait and Harrison Spain, all because I draw pictures… [but] most human beings don”t get asked for their autograph and get told that you were special to their childhoods, or asked ‘Can I take my picture with you?’ Overall, it is very gratifying.”

Joe Rubinstein

Foregoing a panel featuring past Power Rangers, Smash Brothers tournaments, and action figures, the weekend of Rocket Con came and went. Although it’s over, next year’s Rocket Con is something to look forward to for comic book lovers and artists alike.

Written by: Antonio Marquez

KCR News – Facebook Outage

On Mar. 13, around 2 p.m. Pacific Time a global Facebook outage impacted users of the social network platform as well as other Facebook-owned social media such as Instagram and WhatsApp.

SDSU students directly felt the impact of the nearly 24 hour Facebook outage, which is being heralded as one of the largest interruptions the platforms have ever had. Users of the platform reported various problems ranging from being unable to load the site at all, to simply not having the ability to post, like or comment on any material. Justine Saldana, a Senior and Interdisciplinary Studies major, stated she had found out about the dilemma through other social media friends.

“I became aware Facebook and Instagram weren’t working when my fellow food Instagram friends mentioned it early on in our group chat; it was big to them because some of them get paid to post.”

Alejandra Casillas, a Sophomore and Liberal Studies major, became aware of Facebook and Instagram not working while she was trying to post pictures on her social media.

“I was actually trying about 5 times to post some pictures of my day with my boyfriend. It was actually very frustrating because I didn’t know and I thought there was something wrong with my phone.”

Users of the network flocked to Facebook’s social media rival, Twitter, to express their frustrations by using the hashtag #FacebookDown and #InstagramDown. With these tags, users tweeted out and posted memes about the outage. The tweets varied wildly in content, from offering explanations as to why the outage would have occurred, to how people need their social media and how to cope with the current state of their platforms.

Saldana elaborated upon her dependency of the platform for connections both familial and professional;

“I do depend on Facebook a lot to communicate with family and colleagues. For Instagram- not so much. Only because Facebook is a better platform to talk to professional connections… this interruption impacted me directly because I uploaded a picture on my food Instagram and I wanted to see what kind of feedback I was getting from my followers.” 

Casillas similarly revealed her frustration on how she is very dependent on Facebook and Instagram to communicate with those closest to her

“… Sometimes it’s family that I haven’t seen for so long or friends as well and since I don’t have their cell phone numbers I contact them by Facebook or Instagram.”

While Facebook’s services were offline, the company began announcing updates of their current situation via their Twitter account.

“We’re aware that some people are currently having trouble accessing the Facebook family of apps. We’re working to resolve the issue as soon as possible.”

The Instagram Twitter account later proceeded to address its awareness of the “frustration” many users were feeling.

Facebook Outage

Although there were online rumors of the outage being a result of a DDoS attack ( a Distributed Denial-of-Service attack where a hacker floods a site with fake requests to overrun the sites capacity limit), it was later by Facebook that it was not a hacking situation. The company stated on Thursday, that the blame for the outages was due to a “server configuration change that triggered a cascading series of issues” Facebook services are now back online and running.

Written by: Marco Arreola

Dojo Marketplace at The Dojo Cafe

Dojo Marketplace

The coordinated effort between Creative State and Family Reunion finally came into fruition this past Saturday on February 23rd. Presented as “Dojo Marketplace” the event promised a culmination of live music, yoga, clothes, food, and more at The Dojo Cafe.

I had very recently become a part of Creative State and was excited to see all of the hardworking efforts and displays of arts these individuals were going to share at Dojo Marketplace. Arriving to the event shortly after noon, I was automatically greeted with positive spirits and artistic pop-up shops on every corner. Nearly every person that I looked at wore the combination of a smile and a unique outfit.  

 I joined a few of my friends, Bryan and Evan, who I had planned to meet, then came across a group of people wearing shirts with different shades of purple and gray as the live DJ filled the event with music. I began talking to the man at the table, Ernesto, who told me their collective of clothing was known as “aRT Brand Co.”. He explained to me that the team consistently commutes around all of Southern California including Los Angeles, San Marcos, and San Diego. My friends and I entered our names into their raffle for a free shirt, then continued on.  

Enjoying the Dojo Marketplace

As we enjoyed the abundance of happy dogs and good sunlight, I started to wonder how such a eccentric event came to be. It had to start somewhere right?  

That’s when I asked Nick Mora, one of the founders of Creative State, how it all started.  

He explained to me that he and co-founder, Khayri Carter, were sitting on a friend’s couch in Winter 2017 when they began to form the concept that is now officially Creative State. With a lack of any sort of platform for creatives and artists to share their work at San Diego State University, the idea seemed like a gold mine. Now, over a year later, it is really interesting to see just how necessary a group with this mission was. 

Little did I know, I would actually come across Khayri and his own clothing company “Garde” during my next stop at Dojo Marketplace. Bryan, Evan and I caught the design of the clothes by the corner of our eyes and were immediately intrigued. After chatting with Khayri for a while about the long journey his personal designs have come, Bryan and I happily purchased one shirt each and were featured on the official @staygarded Instagram story.  

Nick Mora's Garde shirts at Dojo Marketplace

Garde Shirts

From what I gathered, the yoga sessions were fairly easy, offered as an introduction for beginners. The yoga practice area was very aesthetically pleasing too, so I definitely took advantage of this by aiming the lens of my Sony a6000 and clicking the button on top repeatedly. 

A few art display boards were set up in the middle of the marketplace, with the correlating artists hanging out next to their pieces. We put on our best art analysis hats and began to check out the optical illusions of colors and nude paintings that hung on the display boards. My friend Bryan really seemed to like the nude paintings. Although I personally know little of any drawing, painting or art theory, it was satisfying to see these artists tangible and hard-work being showcased.  

Yoga and Fun

As I took the last of my pictures and felt my skin begin to burn from the high ultraviolet index, we decided to call it a day.  

This is neither the first or last Creative State event, in fact. Dojo Marketplace was the first event of theirs I have attended in my 18 months at San Diego State, and it has certainly got me hyped for the rest to come. 

I feel like a lot of individuals at our college have great ideas and art, but lack an outlet to share it on. Feel free to contact Creative State to meet some similarly-minded people!  

“We host these events to challenge ourselves to test our creative limits and to inspire others to do the same, and I can’t wait to show everyone what we have in store for the SDSU creative community!” stated Nick Mora happily, regarding the future of the collective.  

Creative State x Family Reunion at Dojo Marketplace

Creative State x Family Reunion

Follow the Creative State account to stay posted on the awesome events coming up for the rest of the Spring ‘19 semester. I can guarantee that you will meet a person or find a brand at the events that will make you feel creatively inspired and happy.  

Written by: Justin Neely